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Technological Transfers, Limited Commitment and Growth

  • Alexandre Dmitriev

    (University of New South Wales)

with endogenously incomplete markets and compare the results with the solutions obtained from the perfect risk-sharing and autarkic environments. Our findings suggest that technological transfers may play a role of an important enforcement mechanism. In our framework, existence of substantial rich-to-poor capital flows is not inconsistent with the presence of default risk.

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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2008 Meeting Papers with number 568.

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Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:red:sed008:568
Contact details of provider: Postal: Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA
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