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Limiting Foreign Exchange Exposure through Hedging: The Australian Experience

Author

Listed:
  • Chris Becker

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

  • Daniel Fabbro

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

Abstract

The Australian economy has proven resilient to sizable exchange rate fluctuations over the post-float period. In part this can be attributed to financial institutions and non-financial firms learning to adapt to swings in the Australian dollar. This has included the increased use of financial derivative contracts to hedge their foreign exchange exposures. This paper examines the available evidence on the nature and extent of this hedging behaviour. Related to this, Australia’s net foreign liability position is often cited as a vulnerability of the Australian economy to exchange rate depreciation. We show this not to be the case because much of the liability position is denominated in local currency terms. In fact, the amount of liabilities denominated in foreign currency is less than the amount of foreign currency assets held by residents.

Suggested Citation

  • Chris Becker & Daniel Fabbro, 2006. "Limiting Foreign Exchange Exposure through Hedging: The Australian Experience," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2006-09, Reserve Bank of Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:rba:rbardp:rdp2006-09
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    File URL: http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/2006/pdf/rdp2006-09.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Saikat Nandi & Daniel F. Waggoner, 2000. "Issues in hedging options positions," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q1, pages 24-39.
    4. Nguyen, Hoa & Faff, Robert, 2003. "Can the use of foreign currency derivatives explain variations in foreign exchange exposure?: Evidence from Australian companies," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 193-215, July.
    5. David Hargreaves & Andy Brookes & Carrick Lucas & Bruce White, 2000. "Can hedging insulate firms from exchange rate risk," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 63, March.
    6. Henk Berkman & Michael E. Bradbury & Phil Hancock & Clare Innes, 2002. "Derivative financial instrument use in Australia," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 42(2), pages 97-109.
    7. Dominguez, Kathryn M.E. & Tesar, Linda L., 2006. "Exchange rate exposure," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 188-218, January.
    8. Phil Briggs, 2004. "Currency hedging by exporters and importers," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 67, December.
    9. Bodnar, Gordon M. & Gebhardt, Günther, 1998. "Derivatives usage in risk management by U.S. and German non-financial firms: A comparative survey," CFS Working Paper Series 1998/17, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    10. Pramborg, Bengt, 2005. "Foreign exchange risk management by Swedish and Korean nonfinancial firms: A comparative survey," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 343-366, June.
    11. Jonathan Batten & Robert Mellor & Victor Wan, 1993. "Foreign Exchange Risk Management Practices and Products Used by Australian Firms," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 24(3), pages 557-573, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bénétrix, Agustin S. & Lane, Philip R. & Shambaugh, Jay C., 2015. "International currency exposures, valuation effects and the global financial crisis," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(S1), pages 98-109.
    2. Katalin Bodnár, 2009. "Exchange rate exposure of Hungarian enterprises – results of a survey," MNB Occasional Papers 2009/80, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary).
    3. Philip R. Lane & Jay C. Shambaugh, 2010. "Financial Exchange Rates and International Currency Exposures," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 518-540, March.
    4. Kyoungsoo Yoon, 2013. "FX Funding Risks and Exchange Rate Volatility - Korea's Case," 2013 Meeting Papers 1361, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Clements, Kenneth & Lan, Yihui & Roberts, John, 2008. "Exchange-rate economics for the resources sector," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 102-117, June.
    6. Alexander Ballantyne & Jonathan Hambur & Ivan Roberts & Michelle Wright, 2014. "Financial Reform in Australia and China," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2014-10, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    7. McCauley, Robert N., 2015. "Does the US dollar confer an exorbitant privilege?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 1-14.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    hedging; foreign currency exposure; derivatives;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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