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Oil Stock Discovery and Dutch Disease

  • John Hartwick


    (Queen's University)

  • Kirk Hamilton

We set out a model of a two-good, small open economy exporting a traditional exportable in order to �finance capital goods rental payments. We observe that the traditional export sector declines with an exogenous increase in the country's oil export earnings, while the local goods sector expands. For input price effects to emerge, land is needed as a third input. For the "large land" case, we can have imports of capital steadily decline as oil earnings expand. Earnings from oil sales are stationary under our annuitization construction.

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Paper provided by Queen's University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 1220.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:qed:wpaper:1220
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  1. Xavier Sala-i-Martin & Arvind Subramanian, 2013. "Addressing the Natural Resource Curse: An Illustration from Nigeria," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 22(4), pages 570-615, August.
  2. van Wijnbergen, Sweder, 1984. "Inflation, Employment, and the Dutch Disease in Oil-Exporting Countries: A Short-Run Disequilibrium Analysis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 99(2), pages 233-50, May.
  3. Neary, J Peter & Purvis, Douglas D, 1982. " Sectoral Shocks in a Dependent Economy: Long-run Adjustment and Short-run Accommodation," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 84(2), pages 229-53.
  4. Hartwick, John M, 1995. "Constant Consumption Paths in Open Eocnomies with Exhaustible Resources," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(3), pages 275-83, October.
  5. J. O. Olusi & M. A. Olagunju, 2005. "The Primary Sectors of the Economy and the Dutch Disease in Nigeria," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 44(2), pages 159-175.
  6. Budina, Nina & Pang, Gaobo & van Wijnbergen, Sweder, 2007. "Nigeria's growth record : Dutch disease or debt overhang ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4256, The World Bank.
  7. Ryuhei Okumura & Dapeng Cai, 2007. "Sustainable Constant Consumption In A Semi-Open Economy With Exhaustible Resources," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 58(2), pages 226-237.
  8. Vincent, Jeffrey R. & Panayotou, Theodore & Hartwick, John M., 1997. "Resource Depletion and Sustainability in Small Open Economies," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 274-286, July.
  9. Geir B. Asheim, 1986. "Hartwick's Rule in Open Economies," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 19(3), pages 395-402, August.
  10. Corden, W Max & Neary, J Peter, 1982. "Booming Sector and De-Industrialisation in a Small Open Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(368), pages 825-48, December.
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