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Characteristics of Regional Industry-specific Employment Growth – Empirical Evidence for Germany

  • Matthias Duschl

    ()

    (Department of Geography, Philipps University Marburg)

  • Thomas Brenner

    ()

    (Department of Geography, Philipps University Marburg)

Regional growth dynamics significantly deviate from a normal process. Using industry-specific employment data for German regions, we find that the asymmetric Subbotin distribution is able to account properly for extreme positive and especially negative growth events. This result confirms previous studies on growth rates of firms and countries and fills an important research gap at the meso-level of regions. Furthermore, we show that regional growth patterns emerge to a considerable degree from the aggregation of micro-level firm growth rates distributions and that the knowledge intensity of the respective industries increases the regions’ risk of being effected by extreme growth events.

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Paper provided by Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography in its series Working Papers on Innovation and Space with number 2011-07.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pum:wpaper:2011-07
Contact details of provider: Postal: Deutschhausstrasse 10, 35032 Marburg
Phone: 064212824257
Fax: 064212828950
Web page: http://www.uni-marburg.de/fb19/
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