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"Bad Apple" Peer Effects in Elementary Classrooms: the Case of Corporal Punishment in the Home

Author

Listed:
  • Le, Kien
  • Nguyen, My

Abstract

This paper provides the first empirical evidence on the existence of negative spillover effects from children exposed to corporal punishment in the home. We find that interactions with peers who suffer from physical punishment significantly depress achievement in both math and language among Vietnamese fifth graders. These adverse impacts are transmitted through the reduction of academic expectation and the increased incidence of physical bullies at school in the presence of more corporal-punishment-inflicted peers. Our results offer meaningful implications for both education and social policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Le, Kien & Nguyen, My, 2018. ""Bad Apple" Peer Effects in Elementary Classrooms: the Case of Corporal Punishment in the Home," MPRA Paper 90909, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:90909
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/90909/1/MPRA_paper_90909.pdf
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/96755/1/MPRA_paper_96755.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Victor Lavy & Analia Schlosser, 2011. "Mechanisms and Impacts of Gender Peer Effects at School," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 1-33, April.
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    16. Ozkan Eren, 2017. "Differential Peer Effects, Student Achievement, and Student Absenteeism: Evidence From a Large-Scale Randomized Experiment," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(2), pages 745-773, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corporal Punishment; Violent Disciplinary Practices; Student Achievement; Peer Effects; Family;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy

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