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Five Centuries of Economic Growth in India: The Institutions Perspective

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  • Bhattacharyya, Sambit

Abstract

In this essay I present an analytical growth narrative of India since the sixteenth century. I argue that post independence economic performance is not entirely decoupled from the growth experiences in India during the Mughal and the colonial periods. Institutions perhaps play a key role in explaining economic performance over these periods. I present an analytical framework to understand how institutional change and other deep factors may have influenced economic performance in India during the pre-modern period, de-industrialisation in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and post independence ‘Hindu Growth’ and boom. I argue that useful insights can be drawn by studying growth history of India in its entirety.

Suggested Citation

  • Bhattacharyya, Sambit, 2011. "Five Centuries of Economic Growth in India: The Institutions Perspective," MPRA Paper 67901, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:67901
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Institutions; Economic Development;

    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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