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Club classification of US divorce rates

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  • González-Val, Rafael
  • Marcén, Miriam

Abstract

In this paper, we study the evolution of US divorce rates across states, from 1956 to 1998. By using a cluster algorithm, we identify different groups of states that converge (or diverge) with (or from) each other in the growth of their divorce rates. We find strong support for the club classification. For the overall 1956–1998 period, we obtain evidence of divergence from the common growth component, but when we split the sample, a different pattern is observed. In the pre-unilateral divorce reform period (1956–1972), we find that most of the states had converging divorce rates within several convergence clubs, while in the post-reform period (1973–1998) an intense divergent process took place in divorce rates, across states, within different divergence clubs.

Suggested Citation

  • González-Val, Rafael & Marcén, Miriam, 2014. "Club classification of US divorce rates," MPRA Paper 59440, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:59440
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Bartkowska, Monika & Riedl, Aleksandra, 2012. "Regional convergence clubs in Europe: Identification and conditioning factors," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 22-31.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Divorce rate; convergence club; divergence club;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure

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