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The Wear and Tear on Health: What is the Role of Occupation?

Author

Listed:
  • Ravesteijn, Bastian
  • van Kippersluis, Hans
  • van Doorslaer, Eddy

Abstract

While it seems evident that occupations affect health, effect estimates are scarce. We use a job characteristics matrix in order to characterize occupations by their physical and psychosocial burden in German panel data spanning 26 years. Employing a dynamic model to control for factors that simultaneously affect health and selection into occupation, we find that manual work and low job control both have a substantial negative effect on health that increases with age. The effects of late career exposure to high physical demands and low control at work are comparable to health deterioration due to aging by 16 and 23 months respectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Ravesteijn, Bastian & van Kippersluis, Hans & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2013. "The Wear and Tear on Health: What is the Role of Occupation?," MPRA Paper 50321, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:50321
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Harris, Matthew, 2015. "The impact of body weight on occupational mobility and career development," MPRA Paper 61924, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Michaud, Amanda M. & Wiczer, David, 2014. "Occupational hazards and social disability insurance," Working Papers 2014-24, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 03 Oct 2016.
    3. Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio, 2014. "Do Immigrants Bring Good Health?," IZA Discussion Papers 8073, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio, 2015. "Do immigrants improve the health of natives?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 140-153.
    5. repec:ces:ifodic:v:12:y:2014:i:2:p:19116209 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Michele Belloni & Agar Brugiavini & Elena Maschi & Kea Tijdens, 2014. "Measurement error in occupational coding:an analysis on SHARE data," Working Papers 2014: 24, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    7. Kajitani, Shinya, 2015. "Which is worse for your long-term health, a white-collar or a blue-collar job?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 228-243.
    8. Osea Giuntella, 2014. "Immigration and Job Disamenities," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(2), pages 20-26, 07.
    9. repec:aia:aiaswp:151 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health; labor; dynamic panel data;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General

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