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Social Network and Job Quality: Evidence from Cameroon

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  • Yogo, Urbain Thierry

Abstract

Using Cameroonian data, this paper investigates the effects of social network on job quality. Social network is measured in terms of using friends and relatives while looking for a job. As regards to job quality, two aspects have been taken into consideration: monetary job quality which is captured by wage and non monetary job quality which is captured by a combination of social protection and job security. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of social network as regard to job quality, we make use of both Heckman selection model and Ordered Logit model. Our findings contrast with previous studies. Job seekers who make use of social network do not necessarily get a good job. More precisely, while the users of social networks exhibit a wage premium, they also exhibit a low job quality in terms of social protection and job security. We also find that social network contributes to explain job quality differential according to gender and institutional sectors (formal versus informal).

Suggested Citation

  • Yogo, Urbain Thierry, 2011. "Social Network and Job Quality: Evidence from Cameroon," MPRA Paper 44936, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:44936
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/44936/1/MPRA_paper_44936.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Network; Job quality; Heckman selection model; Ordered Logit;

    JEL classification:

    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions
    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • J39 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Other

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