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Current account sustainability in advanced economies

  • Lanzafame, Matteo

This paper investigates the sustainability of current accounts in advanced economies, using a panel of 27 countries and annual data over the 1980-2008 period. We find strong evidence in favour of nonlinear but stationary current-account trajectories for 14 countries, while the remaining 13 appear to be nonstationary and, thus, unsustainable. Our analysis indicates that careful empirical modeling of current-account dynamics, particularly in relation to cross-section dependence and nonlinear behaviour, is crucial for appropriate economic policymaking.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/42384/1/MPRA_paper_42384.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 42384.

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Date of creation: 01 Nov 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:42384
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  1. Mark J. Holmes & Theodore Panagiotidis & Jesus Otero, 2009. "On the stationarity of current account deficits in the European Union," Discussion Paper Series 2009_18, Department of Economics, University of Macedonia, revised Dec 2009.
  2. Dimitris K. Christopoulos & Miguel León-Ledesma, 2004. "Current Account Sustainability in the US: What Do We Really Know About It?," Studies in Economics 0412, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  3. Choi, In, 2001. "Unit root tests for panel data," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 249-272, April.
  4. Georgios Chortareas & George Kapetanios, 2004. "Getting PPP Right: Identifying Mean Reverting Real Exchange Rates in Panels," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2004 32, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
  5. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2007. "A simple panel unit root test in the presence of cross-section dependence," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(2), pages 265-312.
  6. Quintos, Carmela E, 1995. "Sustainability of the Deficit Process with Structural Shifts," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(4), pages 409-17, October.
  7. Mario Cerrato & Christian de Peretti & Rolf Larsson & Nick Sarantis, 2009. "A Nonlinear Panel Unit Root Test under Cross Section Dependence," Working Papers 2009_28, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
  8. Wu, Jyh-Lin, 2000. "Mean reversion of the current account: evidence from the panel data unit-root test," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 215-222, February.
  9. Karlsson, Sune & Löthgren, Mickael, 1999. "On the power and interpretation of panel unit root tests," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 299, Stockholm School of Economics.
  10. Bohn, Henning, 2007. "Are stationarity and cointegration restrictions really necessary for the intertemporal budget constraint?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(7), pages 1837-1847, October.
  11. Husted, Steven, 1992. "The Emerging U.S. Current Account Deficit in the 1980s: A Cointegration Analysis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(1), pages 159-66, February.
  12. Jörg Breitung & Samarjit Das, 2005. "Panel unit root tests under cross-sectional dependence," Statistica Neerlandica, Netherlands Society for Statistics and Operations Research, vol. 59(4), pages 414-433.
  13. Banerjee, Anindya & Massimiliano Marcellino & Chiara Osbat, 2002. "Testing for PPP: Should We Use Panel Methods?," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2002 13, Royal Economic Society.
  14. Lau, Evan & Zubaidi Baharumshah, Ahmad, 2005. "Mean-reverting behavior of current account in Asian countries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 87(3), pages 367-371, June.
  15. Lau, Evan & Baharumshah, Ahmad Zubaidi & Haw, Chan Tze, 2006. "Current account: mean-reverting or random walk behavior?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 90-107, January.
  16. Mark J. Holmes, 2006. "How Sustainable Are Oecd Current Account Balances In The Long Run?," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 74(5), pages 626-643, 09.
  17. Freund, Caroline, 2005. "Current account adjustment in industrial countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(8), pages 1278-1298, December.
  18. Maddala, G S & Wu, Shaowen, 1999. " A Comparative Study of Unit Root Tests with Panel Data and a New Simple Test," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(0), pages 631-52, Special I.
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