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The design and use of macroeconomics simulation using maple software: A pilot study

Author

Listed:
  • Snarr, Hal W.
  • Gold, Steven C.

Abstract

The mathematical models used in intermediate macroeconomics have become increasingly more sophisticated and challenging for students to learn. This paper demonstrates how mathematics software, such as Maple, can be used to design a simulation as a pedagogical aid. The paper proceeds by developing a system of equations to model the economy, simulating the system with Maple, and illustrating the impacts of fiscal and monetary policy changes. A pilot test of the simulation was performed to see if higher levels of mathematical rigor could be introduced in a principles course. The results indicate that symbolic mathematics software can be an effective teaching and student learning tool.

Suggested Citation

  • Snarr, Hal W. & Gold, Steven C., 2005. "The design and use of macroeconomics simulation using maple software: A pilot study," MPRA Paper 37061, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:37061
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/37061/1/MPRA_paper_37061.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael E. Wetzstein, 1988. "An Organonic and Modern Problems Approach for Teaching Agricultural Economics Principles," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 70(1), pages 63-68.
    2. Scott P. Simkins, 1999. "Promoting Active-Student Learning Using the World Wide Web in Economics Courses," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 278-287, January.
    3. Stephen J. Schmidt, 2003. "Active and Cooperative Learning Using Web-Based Simulations," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 151-167, January.
    4. David H. Gillette, 1994. "Hyperlecturing and Linkages," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 38(2), pages 58-65, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics instruction; macroeconomic simulation; Maple software;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate
    • C02 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Mathematical Economics

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