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Gender differences in the effects of Internet usage on high school absenteeism

  • Austin, Wesley A.
  • Totaro, Michael W.
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    Considerable controversy surrounds the effects technologies such as the Internet have on human capital accumulation. We stratify a large sample of students into males and females and explore gender differences in two related questions: first, does Internet usage affect high school students' absenteeism differently for males and females? Second, to what degree does the intensity of Internet use affect male versus female absenteeism? We utilize data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, which measures educational outcomes, Internet use and a host of other correlates. Poisson regression and probit results indicate that excessive Internet use increases absenteeism for high school students and gender differences are present.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W5H-51TGG41-C/2/a6ec50764d6f61a7970808af1613a7f6
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

    Volume (Year): 40 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 192-198

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:40:y:2011:i:2:p:192-198
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175

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    1. Pavel Yakovlev & Linda Kinney, 2008. "Additional Evidence on the Effect of Class Attendance on Academic Performance," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 36(4), pages 493-494, December.
    2. Tsui-Fang Lin & Jennjou Chen, 2006. "Cumulative class attendance and exam performance," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(14), pages 937-942.
    3. Elchanan Cohn & Eric Johnson, 2006. "Class Attendance and Performance in Principles of Economics," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 211-233.
    4. Joshua Angrist & Victor Lavy, 2002. "New Evidence on Classroom Computers and Pupil Learning," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 735-765, October.
    5. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Amy M. Wolaver, 2002. "Effects Of Heavy Drinking In College On Study Effort, Grade Point Average, And Major Choice," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 20(4), pages 415-428, October.
    7. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
    8. Stephen Devadoss & John Foltz, 1996. "Evaluation of Factors Influencing Student Class Attendance and Performance," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 499-507.
    9. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, May.
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