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Why do Parents Make their Children Work? Evidence from Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey

Author

Listed:
  • Awan, Masood Sarwar
  • Waqas, Muhammad
  • Aslam, Muhammad Amir

Abstract

Since few decades ago, the issue of child labour has detained the global attention. This study highlights the supply side determinants of child labor in case of Punjab, Pakistan. Multiple indicator cluster survey 2007-08 for Punjab was used. Probit model was used to capture the objectives of this research. Results shows that the absence of mother’s education, household head’s education, large family size, low level of family income, less education of child etc. were the factors that pushed the children into work that is often damaging to their development.

Suggested Citation

  • Awan, Masood Sarwar & Waqas, Muhammad & Aslam, Muhammad Amir, 2011. "Why do Parents Make their Children Work? Evidence from Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey," MPRA Paper 31830, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:31830
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/31830/1/MPRA_paper_31830.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ray, R., 2001. "Simultaneous Analysis of Child Labour and Child Schooling: Comparative Evidence from Nepal and Pakistan," Papers 2001-04, Tasmania - Department of Economics.
    2. Pushkar Maitra & Ranjan Ray, 2002. "The Joint Estimation of Child Participation in Schooling and Employment: Comparative Evidence from Three Continents," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(1), pages 41-62.
    3. Fasih, Tazeen, 2007. "Analyzing the impact of legislation on child labor in Pakistan," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4399, The World Bank.
    4. Ray, Ranjan, 2000. "Child Labor, Child Schooling, and Their Interaction with Adult Labor: Empirical Evidence for Peru and Pakistan," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(2), pages 347-367, May.
    5. Cigno, Alessandro & Rosati, Furio C. & Guarcello, Lorenzo, 2002. "Does Globalization Increase Child Labor?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(9), pages 1579-1589, September.
    6. Brown, Martin & Christiansen, Jens & Philips, Peter, 1992. "The Decline of Child Labor in the U.S. Fruit and Vegetable Canning Industry: Law or Economics?," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(04), pages 723-770, December.
    7. Cigno, Alessandro & Rosati, Furio C. & Tzannatos, Zafiris, 2002. "Child labor handbook," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 25507, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Safana, Shaheen & Masood, Sarwar & Muhammad, Waqas & Amir, Aslam, 2012. "Riding for Survival: A Worst Form of Human Trafficking," MPRA Paper 43594, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child labour; MICS; Pakistan;

    JEL classification:

    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty
    • N3 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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