IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/17994.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The “Sheepskin Effects” of Canadian Credentials

Author

Listed:
  • Hui, Taylor Shek-wai

Abstract

This paper re-examines the “sheepskin effects” of educational credentials in Canada using data from the 1996 Census and Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. I found that the estimated credential effects are sensitive to specifications. Regressions analysis in the standard model may not be adequate to control for the workers’ productivity difference unrelated to the credentials. Particularly, the misspecification of the earnings equation and pooling sample might introduce biases into the estimates of credential effects. With carefully constructed comparison groups, the estimated sheepskin effects of a Bachelor’s degree are smaller than that reported in Ferrar and Riddell (2002).

Suggested Citation

  • Hui, Taylor Shek-wai, 2004. "The “Sheepskin Effects” of Canadian Credentials," MPRA Paper 17994, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:17994
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/17994/1/MPRA_paper_17994.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Park, Jin Heum, 1999. "Estimation of sheepskin effects using the old and the new measures of educational attainment in the Current Population Survey," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 237-240, February.
    2. Habermalz, Steffen, 2003. "Job Matching and the Returns to Educational Signals," IZA Discussion Papers 726, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. James J. Heckman & Lance J. Lochner & Petra E. Todd, 2003. "Fifty Years of Mincer Earnings Regressions," NBER Working Papers 9732, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Hui, Taylor Shek-wai, 2004. "The US/Canada Difference in Postsecondary Educational Choice," MPRA Paper 17995, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Riley, John G, 1979. "Testing the Educational Screening Hypothesis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 227-252, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Post-secondary Education; Human Capital; Signaling Effects; Canada.;

    JEL classification:

    • C50 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - General
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:17994. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.