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Sheepskin Effects in Japan

  • Bauer, Thomas K.



  • Dross, Patrick J.


    (DIW Berlin)

  • Haisken-DeNew, John P.


    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research)

Using data for the 1990’s, this paper examines the role of sheepskin effects in the returns to education for Japan. Our estimations indicate that sheepskin effects explain about 50% of the total returns to schooling. We further find that sheepskin effects are only important for workers in small firms with the size of these effects being similar to comparable estimates for the US. These results could be explained by the particular recruitment system of large firms in Japan, which makes the university diploma as a screening device unimportant for large firms.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 593.

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Length: 17 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2002
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: International Journal of Manpower, 2005, 26 (4), 320-335
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp593
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  1. Hungerford, Thomas & Solon, Gary, 1987. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 175-77, February.
  2. Hashimoto, Masanori & Raisian, John, 1985. "Employment Tenure and Earnings Profiles in Japan and the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 721-35, September.
  3. Jaeger, David A & Page, Marianne E, 1996. "Degrees Matter: New Evidence on Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(4), pages 733-40, November.
  4. Heywood, John S., 1994. "How widespread are sheepskin returns to education in the U.S.?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 227-234, September.
  5. Clark, Robert L & Ogawa, Naohiro, 1992. "Employment Tenure and Earnings Profiles in Japan and the United States: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 336-45, March.
  6. Park, Jin Heum, 1999. "Estimation of sheepskin effects using the old and the new measures of educational attainment in the Current Population Survey," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 237-240, February.
  7. David Card & Alan Krueger, 1990. "Does School Quality Matter? Returns to Education and the Characteristics of Public Schools in the United States," NBER Working Papers 3358, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Spence, A Michael, 1973. "Job Market Signaling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 87(3), pages 355-74, August.
  9. Layard, Richard & Psacharopoulos, George, 1974. "The Screening Hypothesis and the Returns to Education," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(5), pages 985-98, Sept./Oct.
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