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An Examination of Sheepskin Effects Over Time

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  • Habermalz, Steffen

    () (University of Mannheim)

Abstract

Previous empirical specifications are not flexible enough to capture the true pattern of sheepskin effects over time. If the quality of the match between the worker and the job contributes to earnings and if higher ability workers more easily reveal their true productivity, sheepskin effects will follow a concave pattern over time. Using the NLSY and measures of actual experience, a variety of specifications (including median regressions) confirm this pattern.

Suggested Citation

  • Habermalz, Steffen, 2003. "An Examination of Sheepskin Effects Over Time," IZA Discussion Papers 725, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp725
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Heywood, John S., 1994. "How widespread are sheepskin returns to education in the U.S.?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 227-234, September.
    2. Hungerford, Thomas & Solon, Gary, 1987. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 175-177, February.
    3. Henry S. Farber & Robert Gibbons, 1996. "Learning and Wage Dynamics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(4), pages 1007-1047.
    4. Koenker,Roger, 2005. "Quantile Regression," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521845731, December.
    5. Layard, Richard & Psacharopoulos, George, 1974. "The Screening Hypothesis and the Returns to Education," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(5), pages 985-998, Sept./Oct.
    6. Belman, Dale & Heywood, John S, 1997. "Sheepskin Effects by Cohort: Implications of Job Matching in a Signaling Model," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(4), pages 623-637, October.
    7. Tayyeb Shabbir, 1991. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education in a Developing Country," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 30(1), pages 1-19.
    8. Edward T. Gullason, 1999. "The Stability Pattern of Sheepskin Effects and Its Implications for the Human Capital Theory--Screening Hypothesis Debate," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 25(2), pages 141-149, Spring.
    9. Kevin Denny & Colm Harmon, 2001. "Testing for sheepskin effects in earnings equations: evidence for five countries," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(9), pages 635-637.
    10. Belman, Dale & Heywood, John S, 1991. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education: An Examination on Women and Minorities," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(4), pages 720-724, November.
    11. Riley, John G, 1979. "Testing the Educational Screening Hypothesis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 227-252, October.
    12. Jaeger, David A & Page, Marianne E, 1996. "Degrees Matter: New Evidence on Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(4), pages 733-740, November.
    13. John Gibson, 2000. "Sheepskin effects and the returns to education in New Zealand: Do they differ by ethnic groups?," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 201-220.
    14. Harley Frazis, 2002. "Human capital, signaling, and the pattern of returns to education," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(2), pages 298-320, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    returns to education; sheepskin effects;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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