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Steffen Habermalz

Personal Details

First Name:Steffen
Middle Name:
Last Name:Habermalz
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pha229
http://www.faculty.econ.northwestern.edu/faculty/habermalz/
Northwestern University Department of Economics 2001 Sheridan Road Evanston IL 60208
1-847-491-8240
Terminal Degree:2002 Economics Department; University of Wisconsin (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(90%) Institute of Labor Economics (IZA)

Bonn, Germany
http://www.iza.org/

:

P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn
RePEc:edi:izaaade (more details at EDIRC)

(10%) Abteilung für Volkswirtschaftslehre
Universität Mannheim

Mannheim, Germany
http://www2.vwl.uni-mannheim.de/

: +49 621 181 1776
+49 621 181 1774
68131 Mannheim
RePEc:edi:fvmande (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Monaco, Kristen & Habermalz, Steffen, 2011. "Wage Inequality of U.S. Truck Drivers," IZA Discussion Papers 5444, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Habermalz, Steffen, 2010. "Rational Inattention and Employer Learning," IZA Discussion Papers 5311, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Habermalz, Steffen & Monaco, Kristen, 2007. "A Post-Deregulation Analysis of Wages in U.S. Freight Transportation," IZA Discussion Papers 2546, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Habermalz, Steffen, 2006. "The Speed of Employer Learning and Job Market Signaling Revisited," IZA Discussion Papers 2309, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Bender, Keith A. & Habermalz, Steffen, 2005. "Are There Differences in the Health-Socioeconomic Status Relationship over the Life Cycle? Evidence from Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 1560, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Habermalz, Steffen, 2003. "An Examination of Sheepskin Effects Over Time," IZA Discussion Papers 725, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Habermalz, Steffen, 2003. "Job Matching and the Returns to Educational Signals," IZA Discussion Papers 726, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

Articles

  1. Steffen Habermalz, 2014. "Rational inattention and employer learning," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(2), pages 605-626.
  2. Steffen Habermalz, 2011. "The speed of employer learning and job market signalling revisited," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(7), pages 607-610.
  3. Kristen Monaco & Steffen Habermalz, 2011. "Wage Inequality of US Truck Drivers," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 25(2), pages 268-285, June.
  4. Keith A. Bender & Steffen Habermalz, 2008. "Are There Differences in the Health- Socio-economic Status Relationship over the Life Cycle? Evidence from Germany," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(1), pages 107-125, March.
  5. Steffen Habermalz, 2006. "More Detail on the Pattern of Returns to Educational Signals," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(1), pages 125-135, July.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Habermalz, Steffen, 2006. "The Speed of Employer Learning and Job Market Signaling Revisited," IZA Discussion Papers 2309, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Hornig, Stephan O. & Rottmann, Horst & Wapler, Rüdiger, 2011. "Sorting on the labour market: A literature overview and theoretical framework," Weidener Diskussionspapiere 27, University of Applied Sciences Amberg-Weiden (OTH).
    2. Julien Prat & Carlos Alos-Ferrer, 2007. "Job Market Signaling and Employer Learning," 2007 Meeting Papers 648, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Tim Perri, 2016. "Signaling and Opitmal Sorting," Working Papers 16-07, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    4. Theodore Koutmeridis, 2013. "The Market for "Rough Diamonds": Information, Finance and Wage Inequality," Discussion Paper Series, Department of Economics 201307, Department of Economics, University of St. Andrews, revised 14 Oct 2013.

  2. Bender, Keith A. & Habermalz, Steffen, 2005. "Are There Differences in the Health-Socioeconomic Status Relationship over the Life Cycle? Evidence from Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 1560, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Eriksson, Tor & Bratsberg, Bernt & Raaum, Oddbjørn, 2005. "Earnings persistence across generations: Transmission through health?," Memorandum 35/2005, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    2. Bender, Keith A. & Theodossiou, Ioannis, 2009. "Controlling for endogeneity in the health-socioeconomic status relationship of the near retired," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 977-987, December.
    3. Sara Rellstab & Marco Pecoraro & Alberto Holly & Philippe Wanner & Karine Renard, 2016. "The Migrant Health Gap and the Role of Labour Market Status: Evidence from Switzerland," IRENE Working Papers 16-14, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
    4. Hostenkamp, Gisela & Stolpe, Michael, 2006. "The health gradient and early retirement: Evidence from the German Socio-economic Panel," Kiel Working Papers 1305, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

  3. Habermalz, Steffen, 2003. "Job Matching and the Returns to Educational Signals," IZA Discussion Papers 726, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Hui, Taylor Shek-wai, 2004. "The “Sheepskin Effects” of Canadian Credentials," MPRA Paper 17994, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Gibbons, Robert & Waldman, Michael, 2003. "Enriching a Theory of Wage and Promotion Dynamics Inside Firms," Working papers 4324-03, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
    3. Francesc Dilme & Fei Li, 2012. "Dynamic Education Signaling with Dropout," PIER Working Paper Archive 12-023, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    4. Francesc Dilme & Fei Li:, 2012. "Dynamic Education Signaling with Dropout, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-048, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 03 Sep 2013.
    5. Francesc Dilme & Fei Li, 2013. "Dynamic Education Signaling with Dropout Risk, Third Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 14-014, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 24 Apr 2014.

Articles

  1. Steffen Habermalz, 2011. "The speed of employer learning and job market signalling revisited," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(7), pages 607-610.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Keith A. Bender & Steffen Habermalz, 2008. "Are There Differences in the Health- Socio-economic Status Relationship over the Life Cycle? Evidence from Germany," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(1), pages 107-125, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Steffen Habermalz, 2006. "More Detail on the Pattern of Returns to Educational Signals," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(1), pages 125-135, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Mora Rodríguez, Jhon James & Muro, Juan, 2015. "On the size of sheepskin effects: A meta-analysis," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 9, pages 1-18.
    2. Waldman, Michael, 2007. "Theory and evidence in internal labor markets," MPRA Paper 5113, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Keith A. Bender & John Douglas Satun, 2009. "Constrained By Hours And Restricted In Wages: The Quality Of Matches In The Labor Market," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 47(3), pages 512-529, July.
    4. Bitzan, John D., 2009. "Do sheepskin effects help explain racial earnings differences?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 759-766, December.
    5. Jed DeVaro & Michael Waldman, 2012. "The Signaling Role of Promotions: Further Theory and Empirical Evidence," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(1), pages 91-147.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (4) 2003-03-03 2006-09-23 2010-11-27 2011-01-30
  2. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2006-09-23
  3. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2010-11-27
  4. NEP-EEC: European Economics (1) 2005-04-24
  5. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2005-04-24
  6. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2006-09-23

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