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Sheepskin Effects by Cohort: Implications of Job Matching in a Signaling Model

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  • Belman, Dale
  • Heywood, John S

Abstract

In the presence of job matching, the returns to education signals are shown to decline in value as additional work experience allows more direct observation of productivity. This is tested by estimating sheepskin effects across five age cohorts of nonminority males in 1991. The effects are large and significant in early cohorts and virtually nonexistent in later cohorts. This pattern is partially confirmed with estimations within cohorts showing sheepskin returns declining from 1979 to 1991. The pattern within cohorts suggests that the 1991 pattern is not merely the result of vintage effects, but caution is expressed in drawing conclusions. Copyright 1997 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Belman, Dale & Heywood, John S, 1997. "Sheepskin Effects by Cohort: Implications of Job Matching in a Signaling Model," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(4), pages 623-637, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:49:y:1997:i:4:p:623-37
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    Cited by:

    1. Jhon James Mora, 2003. "Sheepskin effects and screening in Colombia," COLOMBIAN ECONOMIC JOURNAL, UN - RCE - CID, April.
      • Jhon James Mora, 2003. "Sheepskin effects and screening in Colombia," Colombian Economic Journal, Academia Colombiana de Ciencias Economicas, Colegio Mayor de Nuestra Senora del Rosario, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Universidad de Antioquia, Universidad de los Andes, Universidad del Valle, Universidad Externado de Colombia, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, vol. 1(1), pages 95-108, December.
    2. Norbert R. Schady, 2003. "Convexity and Sheepskin Effects in the Human Capital Earnings Function: Recent Evidence for Filipino Men," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 65(2), pages 171-196, May.
    3. Nakabayashi, Masaki, 2011. "Schooling, employer learning, and internal labor market effect: Wage dynamics and human capital investment in the Japanese steel industry, 1930-1960s," MPRA Paper 30597, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Barbara Ermini & Luca Papi & Francesca Scaturro, 2017. "Over education and the great recession. The case of italian PH.D graduates," Working Papers 420, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    5. Darwin Miller, 2007. "Isolating the Causal Impact of Community College Enrollment on Educational Attainment and Labor Market Outcomes in Texas," Discussion Papers 06-033, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    6. Bitzan, John D., 2009. "Do sheepskin effects help explain racial earnings differences?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 759-766, December.
    7. Borghans,L. & Grip,A.,de, 1999. "Skills and low pay: upgrading or overeducation?," ROA Research Memorandum 005, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    8. repec:spr:italej:v:3:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s40797-017-0053-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Todd R. Stinebrickner & Ralph Stinebrickner, 2000. "The Relationship Between Family Income and Schooling Attainment: Evidence from a Liberal Arts College with a Full Tuition Subsidy Program," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 20008, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
    10. Kun Andras Istvan, 2014. "The Sheepskin Effect In The Hungarian Labour Market 2010-2012: Analysis Of Data From The Hungarian Graduate Tracking System," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 492-499, July.
    11. Keith A. Bender & John S. Heywood, 2009. "Educational Mismatch among Ph.D.s: Determinants and Consequences," NBER Chapters,in: Science and Engineering Careers in the United States: An Analysis of Markets and Employment, pages 229-255 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Mora Rodríguez, Jhon James & Muro, Juan, 2015. "On the size of sheepskin effects: A meta-analysis," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 9, pages 1-18.
    13. Crespo, Anna Risi Vianna & Reis, Mauricio Cortez, 2009. "O Efeito-Diploma e a Relação Entre Rendimentos e Educação: Uma Análise da Evolução ao Longo do Tempo no Brasil," Revista Brasileira de Economia - RBE, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil), vol. 63(3), August.
    14. Matloob Piracha & Florin Vadean, 2013. "Migrant educational mismatch and the labor market," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 9, pages 176-192 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Barbara Ermini & Luca Papi & Francesca Scaturro, 2016. "Over-education among italian Ph.D. graduates. Does the crisis make a difference?," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 126, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    16. Sascha L. Schmidt & Benno Torgler & Bruno S. Frey, 2006. "Die Auswirkungen von Neid auf individuelle Leistungen: Ergebnisse einer Panelanalyse," CREMA Working Paper Series 2006-28, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    17. Colin Green & John S. Heywood & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos, 2017. "Employer size and supervisor earnings: Evidence from Britain," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 04-2017, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    18. Béatrice le Rhun & Olivier Monso, 2015. "De l'utilité d'obtenir son diplôme pour s'insérer : l'exemple des brevets de technicien supérieur," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 478(1), pages 35-56.
    19. Habermalz, Steffen, 2003. "Job Matching and the Returns to Educational Signals," IZA Discussion Papers 726, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    20. Antelius, Jesper, 2000. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education: Evidence on Swedish Data," Working Paper Series 158, Trade Union Institute for Economic Research.
    21. Habermalz, Steffen, 2003. "An Examination of Sheepskin Effects Over Time," IZA Discussion Papers 725, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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