IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pke/wpaper/pkwp1611.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The macroeconomics of shadow banking

Author

Listed:
  • Alberto Botta

    () (University of Greenwich)

  • Eugenio Caversazi
  • Daniele Tori

Abstract

In this paper, we propose a simple short-run post-Keynesian model in which the key aspects of shadow banking, namely securitization and the production of structured finance instruments, are explicitly formalized. At the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to broaden purely real-side post-Keynesian models and their traditional focus on shareholder-value orientation, the financialization of non-financial firms, and the profit-led vs wage-led dichotomy. We rather put emphasis on the role of financial institutions and rentier-friendly environment in determining the predominance of specific growth and distribution regimes. First, we illustrate the macroeconomic rationale of shadow banking practices. We show how, before the 2007-8 crisis, securitization and shadow banking allowed for an increase in profitability for the whole financial sector, while apparently keeping leverage under control. Second, we define a variety of shadow-banking-led regimes in terms of economic activity, productive capital accumulation, and income distribution. We show that both an ‘exhilarationist’ and a ‘stagnationist’ regime may prevail, nevertheless characterized by a probable increase in income inequality between rentiers and wage earners.

Suggested Citation

  • Alberto Botta & Eugenio Caversazi & Daniele Tori, 2016. "The macroeconomics of shadow banking," Working Papers PKWP1611, Post Keynesian Economics Society (PKES).
  • Handle: RePEc:pke:wpaper:pkwp1611
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.postkeynesian.net/downloads/working-papers/PKWP1611_7CTLkIa.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2016
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Amit Bhaduri & Srinivas Raghavendra & Vishwesha Guttal, 2015. "On the Systemic Fragility of Finance-Led Growth," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(1), pages 158-186, February.
    2. Nicola Cetorelli & Benjamin H. Mandel & Lindsay Mollineaux, 2012. "The evolution of banks and financial intermediation: framing the analysis," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Jul, pages 1-12.
    3. Alberto Botta & Eugenio Caverzasi & Daniele Tori, 2015. "Financial–Real-Side Interactions in an Extended Monetary Circuit with Shadow Banking: Loving or Dangerous Hugs?," International Journal of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(3), pages 196-227, July.
    4. Dorothy Power & Gerald Epstein, 2003. "Rentier Incomes and Financial Crises: An Empirical Examination of Trends and Cycles in Some OECD Countries," Working Papers wp57, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    5. Eugenio Caverzasi & Antoine Godin, 2015. "Post-Keynesian stock-flow-consistent modelling: a survey," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 39(1), pages 157-187.
    6. Pozsar, Zoltan & Adrian, Tobias & Ashcraft, Adam B. & Boesky, Hayley, 2013. "Shadow banking," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Dec, pages 1-16.
      • Zoltan Pozsar & Tobias Adrian & Adam B. Ashcraft & Hayley Boesky, 2010. "Shadow banking," Staff Reports 458, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    7. Yeva Nersisyan & L. Randall Wray, 2010. "The global financial crisis and the shift to shadow banking," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 7(2), pages 377-400.
    8. Ozlem Onaran & Thomas Obst, 2016. "Wage-led growth in the EU15 member-states: the effects of income distribution on growth, investment, trade balance and inflation," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(6), pages 1517-1551.
    9. Eric Tymoigne, 2009. "Securitization, Deregulation, Economic Stability, and Financial Crisis, Part I--The Evolution of Securitization," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_573_1, Levy Economics Institute.
    10. Bhaduri, Amit & Marglin, Stephen, 1990. "Unemployment and the Real Wage: The Economic Basis for Contesting Political Ideologies," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(4), pages 375-393, December.
    11. Engelbert Stockhammer, 2004. "Financialisation and the slowdown of accumulation," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(5), pages 719-741, September.
    12. Alberto Botta, 2015. "The complex inequality-innovation-public investment nexus: What we (don't) know, what we should, and what we have to do," Working Papers PKWP1506, Post Keynesian Economics Society (PKES).
    13. Bindseil, Ulrich & Domnick, Clemens & Zeuner, Jörg, 2015. "Critique of accommodating central bank policies and the 'expropriation of the saver' - A review," Occasional Paper Series 161, European Central Bank.
    14. Joshua Coval & Jakub Jurek & Erik Stafford, 2009. "The Economics of Structured Finance," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 3-25, Winter.
    15. Gorton, Gary & Metrick, Andrew, 2012. "Securitized banking and the run on repo," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 425-451.
    16. Adam Copeland & Antoine Martin & Michael Walker, 2014. "Repo Runs: Evidence from the Tri-Party Repo Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(6), pages 2343-2380, December.
    17. Photis Lysandrou, 2005. "Globalisation as commodification," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(5), pages 769-797, September.
    18. Eckhard Hein, 2010. "Shareholder Value Orientation, Distribution And Growth-Short- And Medium-Run Effects In A Kaleckian Model," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 302-332, May.
    19. Özlem Onaran & Engelbert Stockhammer & Lucas Grafl, 2011. "Financialisation, income distribution and aggregate demand in the USA," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(4), pages 637-661.
    20. Nikolaidi, Maria, 2015. "Securitisation, wage stagnation and financial fragility: a stock-flow consistent perspective," Greenwich Papers in Political Economy 14078, University of Greenwich, Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre.
    21. Peter Skott & Soon Ryoo, 2008. "Macroeconomic implications of financialisation," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(6), pages 827-862, November.
    22. Mariana Mazzucato, 2013. "Financing innovation: creative destruction vs. destructive creation," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(4), pages 851-867, August.
    23. Carmen M. Reinhart & Vincent Reinhart, 2010. "After the fall," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 17-60.
    24. Daniele Tori & Özlem Onaran, 2018. "The effects of financialization on investment: evidence from firm-level data for the UK," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(5), pages 1393-1416.
    25. Amit Bhaduri, 2011. "A contribution to the theory of financial fragility and crisis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(6), pages 995-1014.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:oup:indcch:v:27:y:2018:i:6:p:999-1014. is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Eugenio Caverzasi & Daniele Tori, 2018. "The Financial Innovation Hypothesis: Schumpeter, Minsky and the sub-prime mortgage crisis," LEM Papers Series 2018/36, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    3. repec:psl:pslqrr:2017:23 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Andrea Mazzocchetti & Marco Raberto & Andrea Teglio & Silvano Cincotti, 2018. "Securitization and business cycle: an agent-based perspective," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(6), pages 1091-1121.
    5. Tori, Daniele & Onaran, Özlem, 2017. "The effects of financialisation and financial development on investment: evidence from firm-level data in Europe," Greenwich Papers in Political Economy 16089, University of Greenwich, Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre.
    6. Eugenio Caverzasi & Alberto Russo, 2018. "Toward a new microfounded macroeconomics in the wake of the crisis," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(6), pages 999-1014.
    7. Botta, Alberto & Caverzasi, Eugenio & Russo, Alberto, 2019. "When complexity meets finance: a contribution to the study of the macroeconomic effects of complex financial systems," Greenwich Papers in Political Economy 23121, University of Greenwich, Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    securitization; shadow banking; leverage; rentiers-led regimes; income distribution;

    JEL classification:

    • E02 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Institutions and the Macroeconomy
    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pke:wpaper:pkwp1611. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jo Michell). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/pksggea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.