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Poverty, Fertility Preferences, and Family Planning Practices in the Philippines

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  • Orbeta, Aniceto Jr. C.

Abstract

This paper looks at the interaction of poverty, fertility preferences, and family planning practices in the Philippines using the series of nationally representative family planning surveys conducted annually since 1999 augmented by census and other survey data. Its contribution lies in providing recent and nationally representative empirical evidence on the long-running but largely unresolved debate in the country on the relationship between fertility preferences and family planning and socioeconomic status. The paper shows that while the number of children ever born is indeed larger among poorer households, their demand for additional children is actually lower and their contraceptive practice is also poorer. This result indicates that, in the case of the Philippines, the larger number of children among the poor is more the result of poorer contraceptive practice than the higher demand for additional children.

Suggested Citation

  • Orbeta, Aniceto Jr. C., 2007. "Poverty, Fertility Preferences, and Family Planning Practices in the Philippines," Philippine Journal of Development PJD 2006 Vol. XXXIII Nos., Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:phd:pjdevt:pjd_2006_vol__xxxiii_nos__1and2-e
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Aniceto C. Orbeta, 2006. "Poverty, Vulnerability and Family Size: Evidence from the Philippines," Chapters, in: John Weiss & Haider A. Khan (ed.), Poverty Strategies in Asia, chapter 6, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1976. "Child Endowments and the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages 143-162, August.
    3. Ruperto P. Alonzo, et al, 2004. "Population and Poverty : The Real Score," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 200415, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
    4. Orbeta, Aniceto Jr. C., 2002. "Population and Poverty: A Review of the Links, Evidence and Implications for the Philippines," Discussion Papers DP 2002-21, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    5. Reyes, Celia M., 2002. "The Poverty Fight: Have We Made an Impact?," Discussion Papers DP 2002-20, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    6. Orbeta, Aniceto Jr. C. & Cuenca, Janet S. & del Prado, Fatima & Acejo, Iris L., 2003. "Family Planning and Maternal and Child Health Outcomes, Utilization and Access to Services by Asset Quintile: New Evidence from the FPS and MCHS," Discussion Papers DP 2003-14, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    7. Rivers, Douglas & Vuong, Quang H., 1988. "Limited information estimators and exogeneity tests for simultaneous probit models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 347-366, November.
    8. David E. Sahn & David Stifel, 2003. "Exploring Alternative Measures of Welfare in the Absence of Expenditure Data," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 49(4), pages 463-489, December.
    9. Deborah Degraff & Richard Bilsborrow & David Guilkey, 1997. "Community-level determinants of contraceptive use in the Philippines: A structural analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(3), pages 385-398, August.
    10. repec:phd:dpaper:pn_2004-12 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Kenneth Bollen & David Guilkey & Thomas Mroz, 1995. "Binary outcomes and endogenous explanatory variables: Tests and solutions with an application to the demand for contraceptive use in tunisia," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 32(1), pages 111-131, February.
    12. Gary S. Becker, 1960. "An Economic Analysis of Fertility," NBER Chapters, in: Demographic and Economic Change in Developed Countries, pages 209-240, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Carrasco, Marine & Kotchoni, Rachidi, 2017. "Efficient Estimation Using The Characteristic Function," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, pages 479-526.
    2. Dieudonne Ndaruhuye Muhoza, 2019. "The heterogeneous effects of socioeconomic and cultural factors on fertility preferences: evidence from Rwanda and Kenya," Journal of Population Research, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 347-363, December.
    3. Christelle DUMAS & Arnaud LEFRANC, 2013. ""Sex in Marriage is a Divine Gift": For whom ? Evidence from the Manila contraceptive ban," THEMA Working Papers 2013-22, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    4. Yaya, OlaOluwa S & Osanyintupin, Olawale D, 2017. "Determinants of Desired and Actual Number of Children and the Risk of having more than Two Children in Ghana and Nigeria," MPRA Paper 88824, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    poverty; family planning; Philippines; fertility preferences; socioeconomic status;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General

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