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In-group favouritism and out-group discimination in naturally occurring groups

  • Donna Harris
  • Klaus Abbink

We study in-group favouritism and out-group discrimination in a multiplayer dictator game.An allocator divides a large sum of money among three groups of 20 recipients each and Self.Allocations to groups are divided equally among the group members.The three groups are supporters of the two rival political movements in Thailand (“yellow shirts” versus “red shirts”) and political neutral subjects. A control treatment with artificial groups (“group A”, “group B”, and “non-affiliated”) is also conducted.We find that allocators strongly favour their own group and discriminate against supporters of the rival party.Despite a strong anti-corruption stance of the yellow-shirt movement members of both political groups are indistinguishable in both favouritism and discrimination.Allocators tend to be rather selfish: on average 45% of the pie is given to Self, despite the large number of recipients.

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Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number 616.

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Date of creation: 02 Jul 2012
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Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:616
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  1. Matteo Ploner & Ivan Soraperra, 2004. "Groups and Social Norms in the Economic Context: A Preliminary Experimental Investigation," CEEL Working Papers 0403, Cognitive and Experimental Economics Laboratory, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.
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  5. C. Monica Capra & Lei Li, 2006. "Conformity in Contribution Games: Gender and Group Effects," Emory Economics 0601, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).
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  8. Gary Bornstein & Tamar Kugler & Anthony Ziegelmeyer, 2002. "Individual and Group Decisions in the Centipede Game: Are Groups More “Rational” Players?," Discussion Paper Series dp298, The Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
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