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Determinants of in-group bias: Is group affiliation mediated by guilt-aversion?

  • Güth, Werner
  • Ploner, Matteo
  • Regner, Tobias

In-group favoritism in social dilemma situations is one of Social Identity Theory's main findings. We investigate what causes the in-group bias: is it merely due to group affiliation or, alternatively, is guilt-aversion moderating the strength of in-group favoring? We induce group membership in a minimal group setting, observe in-/out-group transfers and elicit corresponding beliefs. According to our experimental data group affiliation affects beliefs and explains a substantial part of the bias. Evidence for guilt-aversion is found only when beliefs are elicited before actions.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Psychology.

Volume (Year): 30 (2009)
Issue (Month): 5 (October)
Pages: 814-827

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Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:30:y:2009:i:5:p:814-827
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/joep

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