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Stock Market Comovements in Central Europe: Evidence from Asymmetric DCC Model

  • Dritan Gjika

    (Institute of Economic Studies, Charles University, Prague)

  • Roman Horváth


We examine time-varying stock market comovements in Central Europe employing the asymmetric dynamic conditional correlation multivariate GARCH model. Using daily data from 2001 to 2011, we find that the correlations among stock markets in Central Europe and between Central Europe vis–à–vis the euro area are strong. They increased over time, especially after the EU entry and remained largely at these levels during financial crisis. The stock markets exhibit asymmetry in the conditional variances and in the conditional correlations, to a certain extent, too, pointing to an importance of applying sufficiently flexible econometric framework. The conditional variances and correlations are positively related suggesting that the diversification benefits decrease disproportionally during volatile periods.

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Paper provided by Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies) in its series Working Papers with number 322.

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Length: 21
Date of creation: Sep 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ost:wpaper:322
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