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Health insurance coverage and firm performance: Evidence using firm level data from Vietnam

Author

Listed:
  • Hiroyuki Yamada

    (Faculty of Economics, Keio University)

  • Tien Manh Vu

    (International Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University)

Abstract

In literature, there is limited direct evidence regarding the effect of health insurance coverage on firm performance and worker productivity. In this paper, we study the impacts of health insurance on medium and large-scale domestic private firms' performance and productivity in Vietnam, using a large firm level census dataset. We deploy propensity-score matching methods, and find statistically positive health insurance effects on both aggregate profit and profit per worker for both complying and non-complying medium and large-scale firms. Given the full sample results, we recommend an improvement in government monitoring as one of the important policy options to induce medium and large-scale firms to contribute to health insurance premiums for their employees.

Suggested Citation

  • Hiroyuki Yamada & Tien Manh Vu, 2016. "Health insurance coverage and firm performance: Evidence using firm level data from Vietnam," OSIPP Discussion Paper 16E007, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
  • Handle: RePEc:osp:wpaper:16e007
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. A. Smith, Jeffrey & E. Todd, Petra, 2005. "Does matching overcome LaLonde's critique of nonexperimental estimators?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 305-353.
    2. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra E. Todd, 1997. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 605-654.
    3. Daniel Cotlear & Somil Nagpal & Owen Smith & Ajay Tandon & Rafael Cortez, 2015. "Going Universal," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 22011, July.
    4. Marco Caliendo & Sabine Kopeinig, 2008. "Some Practical Guidance For The Implementation Of Propensity Score Matching," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 31-72, February.
    5. Midori Matsushima & Hiroyuki Yamada, 2013. "Public Health Insurance in Vietnam towards Universal Coverage: Identifying the challenges, issues, and problems in its design and organizational practices," OSIPP Discussion Paper 13E003, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health insurance; Medium and large-scale firms; Propensity-score matching; Vietnam;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy

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