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Endogenous Leverage and Asset Pricing in Double Auctions

We study the trading of real assets financed by collateralized loans in an agent based model of a continuous double auction. This approach provides a complementary perspective on recent advances in the general equilibrium theory of endogenous leverage by studying a model that simultaneously describes dynamic and equilibrium properties of the market. Rather than taking prices as parametric there is an explicit price formation process which can be simulated or studied empirically. This is important because the economics of leverage is key to the understanding of financial crisis. We find that simulated double auctions converge to stable final states close to the theoretical equilibrium state. Consistent with equilibrium theory, real assets are traded at a price above fundamental value in the double auction. The equilibrium level of leverage also emerges in the simulations of the double auction.

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Paper provided by Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank) in its series Working Papers with number 184.

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Length: 29
Date of creation: 31 Jul 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:onb:oenbwp:184
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  1. Stefan Thurner & J. Doyne Farmer & John Geanakoplos, 2012. "Leverage causes fat tails and clustered volatility," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(5), pages 695-707, February.
  2. Felix Kubler & Karl Schmedders, 2001. "Stationary Equilibria in Asset-Pricing Models with Incomplete Markets and Collateral," Discussion Papers 1319, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  3. Weerachart Kilenthong, 2011. "Collateral premia and risk sharing under limited commitment," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 475-501, April.
  4. Tobias Adrian & Hyun Song Shin, 2008. "Liquidity and leverage," Staff Reports 328, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  5. John Geanakoplos, 2010. "The Leverage Cycle," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2009, Volume 24, pages 1-65 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Holmstrom, Bengt & Tirole, Jean, 1997. "Financial Intermediation, Loanable Funds, and the Real Sector," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(3), pages 663-91, August.
  7. Geanakoplos, John & William R. Zame, 2013. "Collateral Equilibrium: A Basic Framework," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1906, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  8. Ana Fostel & John Geanakoplos, 2011. "Endogenous Leverage: VaR and Beyond," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1800, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  9. Bernanke, Ben & Gertler, Mark & Gilchrist, Simon, 1996. "The Financial Accelerator and the Flight to Quality," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 1-15, February.
  10. Mertens, J. F., 2003. "The limit-price mechanism," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(5-6), pages 433-528, July.
  11. Friedman, Daniel & Abraham, Ralph, 2009. "Bubbles and crashes: Gradient dynamics in financial markets," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 922-937, April.
  12. John Geanakoplos, 2009. "The Leverage Cycle," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1715R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Jan 2010.
  13. Nobuhiro Kiyotaki & John Moore, 1995. "Credit Cycles," NBER Working Papers 5083, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Bossaerts, Peter, 2009. "The Experimental Study of Asset Pricing Theory," Foundations and Trends(R) in Finance, now publishers, vol. 3(4), pages 289-361, November.
  15. Gary B. Gorton & Andrew Metrick, 2012. "Getting up to Speed on the Financial Crisis: A One-Weekend-Reader's Guide," NBER Working Papers 17778, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. John Geanakoplos, 2010. "Solving the Present Crisis and Managing the Leverage Cycle," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1751, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  17. Shin, Hyun Song, 2010. "Risk and Liquidity," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199546367, March.
  18. John Geanakoplos, 2010. "Solving the present crisis and managing the leverage cycle," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Aug, pages 101-131.
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