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Effect of Conflict on Dietary Energy Supply: Evidence from Cote d'Ivoire


  • Andrew L. Dabalen
  • Saumik Paul


In this paper we estimate the causal effects of conflict on dietary energy supply in Côte d’Ivoire. To identify the true impact of conflict, we use prewar and post-war household data bracketing the conflict period and the spatial variation in the prevalence of conflict between the North and South regions. Our second identification strategy uses the specific counts of conflict events across departments. For our third identification strategy, we employ self-reported victimization indicators at the individual level. Combining data from household surveys (Households Living Standards Surveys) and the conflict database (ACLED), we find robust and statistically significant evidence of households in the worst-hit conflict areas and individuals who are the direct victims of the conflict having lower dietary energy supply. The propensity score matching estimates do not alter the main findings. Other robustness checks including firstly, subsamples of households with children and secondly, alternative estimation of conflict intensity provide mixed but encouraging evidence that supports the impact of conflict on food security. JEL Classifications: I20, I3, D12, C40, H43, O15

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew L. Dabalen & Saumik Paul, "undated". "Effect of Conflict on Dietary Energy Supply: Evidence from Cote d'Ivoire," Discussion Papers 12/09, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
  • Handle: RePEc:not:notcre:12/09

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Anna D'Souza & Dean Jolliffe, 2012. "Rising Food Prices and Coping Strategies: Household-level Evidence from Afghanistan," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(2), pages 282-299, August.
    2. Andrew L. Dabalen & Saumik Paul, 2013. "Recovering Comparable Poverty Estimates in Côte d'Ivoire," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(10), pages 1412-1426, October.
    3. Shemyakina, Olga, 2011. "The effect of armed conflict on accumulation of schooling: Results from Tajikistan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 186-200, July.
    4. Marco Caliendo & Sabine Kopeinig, 2008. "Some Practical Guidance For The Implementation Of Propensity Score Matching," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 31-72, February.
    5. D'Souza, Anna & Jolliffe, Dean, 2010. "Rising food prices and coping strategies : household-level evidence from Afghanistan," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5466, The World Bank.
    6. Camelia Minoiu & Olga Shemyakina, 2012. "Child Health and Conflict in Cote d'Ivoire," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 294-299, May.
    7. Bryson, Alex & Dorsett, Richard & Purdon, Susan, 2002. "The use of propensity score matching in the evaluation of active labour market policies," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4993, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Pasquale Scaramozzino, 2006. "Measuring Vulnerability to Food Insecurity," Working Papers 06-12, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Paul, Saumik & Shonchoy, Abu S. & Dabalen, Andrew, 2015. "Food crop diversification as a risk mitigating strategy during conflict : evidence from Cote d'Ivoire," IDE Discussion Papers 496, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).

    More about this item


    Conflict; Food security; Nutrition; Evaluation; Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • C40 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - General
    • H43 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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