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Effect of Conflict on Dietary Diversity: Evidence from Côte d’Ivoire

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  • Dabalen, Andrew L.
  • Paul, Saumik

Abstract

In this paper we estimate the causal effects of conflict on dietary diversity in Côte d’Ivoire. To identify the true impact of conflict, we use (1) pre-war and post-war household data, (2) the specific counts of conflict events across departments, and (3) self-reported victimization indicators. We find robust and statistically significant evidence of households in the worst-hit conflict areas and individuals who are the direct victims of the conflict having lower dietary diversity. The propensity score-matching estimates do not alter the main findings. Other robustness checks including subsamples of households with children support the existing findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Dabalen, Andrew L. & Paul, Saumik, 2014. "Effect of Conflict on Dietary Diversity: Evidence from Côte d’Ivoire," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 143-158.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:58:y:2014:i:c:p:143-158
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2014.01.010
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    Cited by:

    1. Kudo, Yuya, 2016. "Malaria infection and fetal growth during the war : evidence from Liberia," IDE Discussion Papers 556, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    2. Elise Pauzé & Malek Batal & Yvens Philizaire & Rosanne Blanchet & Dia Sanou, 2016. "Determinants of diet quality among rural households in an intervention zone of Grande Anse, Haiti," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(6), pages 1123-1134, December.

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    Keywords

    conflict; food security; nutrition; evaluation; Africa;

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