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Measuring Vulnerability to Food Insecurity

Author

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  • Pasquale Scaramozzino

    (Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”)

Abstract

This paper develops a novel approach to the analysis of vulnerability in the context of food security. The proposed methodology incorporates recent developments in the analysis of risk management. It can be applied to estimate the probability that a household or a community might fall below a critical food security threshold at some time in the future. The methodology also aims to identify the risk management strategies which are most effective in reducing the likelihood of the occurrence of food insecurity or the severity of its effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Pasquale Scaramozzino, 2006. "Measuring Vulnerability to Food Insecurity," Working Papers 06-12, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  • Handle: RePEc:fao:wpaper:0612
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    File URL: ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/009/ah630e/ah630e00.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ugo Gentilini & Patrick Webb, 2005. "How Are We Doing on Poverty and Hunger Reduction?: A New Measure of Country-Level Progress," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 31, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.
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    3. Fattouh, Bassam & Scaramozzino, Pasquale & Harris, Laurence, 2005. "Capital structure in South Korea: a quantile regression approach," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 231-250, February.
    4. Sen, Amartya, 1988. "The concept of development," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 9-26 Elsevier.
    5. Raghav Gaiha & Katsushi Imai, 2004. "Vulnerability, shocks and persistence of poverty: estimates for semi-arid rural South India," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 261-281.
    6. Glewwe, Paul & Hall, Gillette, 1998. "Are some groups more vulnerable to macroeconomic shocks than others? Hypothesis tests based on panel data from Peru," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 181-206, June.
    7. Buchinsky, Moshe, 1995. "Estimating the asymptotic covariance matrix for quantile regression models a Monte Carlo study," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 303-338, August.
    8. Stefan Dercon & Pramila Krishnan, 2000. "Vulnerability, seasonality and poverty in Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 25-53.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Raghbendra Jha & Tu Dang, 2009. "Vulnerability to Poverty in select Central Asian Countries," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 6(1), pages 17-50, June.
    2. Raghbendra JHA & Tu DANG & Krishna Lal SHARMA, 2009. "Vulnerability to poverty in Fiji," International Journal of Applied Econometrics and Quantitative Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 9(1).
    3. Edeh, Hyacinth Onuorah & Gyimah-Brempong, Kwabena, 2014. "Determinants of Change and Household Responses to Food Insecurity: Empirical Evidence from Nigeria," 88th Annual Conference, April 9-11, 2014, AgroParisTech, Paris, France 169750, Agricultural Economics Society.
    4. Bashir, Muhammad Khalid & Schilizzi, Steven, 2012. "Measuring food security: Definitional sensitivity and implications," 2012 Conference (56th), February 7-10, 2012, Freemantle, Australia 124227, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    5. Raghbendra Jha & Tu Dang, 2008. "Vulnerability to poverty in Papua New Guinea," Departmental Working Papers 2008-08, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    6. Raghbendra Jha & Tu Dang, 2012. "Education and the Vulnerability to Food Inadequacy in Timor-Leste," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(3), pages 341-357, January.
    7. John Kamau Gathiaka & Moses Kinyanjui Muriithi, 2017. "An Empirical Analysis of Livelihood Strategies and Food Insecurity in Turkana County, Kenya," Research Papers RP_338, African Economic Research Consortium.
    8. Raghbendra Jha & Tu Dang & Yusuf Tashrifov, 2010. "Economic vulnerability and poverty in Tajikistan," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 95-112, May.
    9. Dabalen, Andrew L. & Paul, Saumik, 2014. "Effect of Conflict on Dietary Diversity: Evidence from Côte d’Ivoire," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 143-158.
    10. Andrew L. Dabalen & Saumik Paul, "undated". "Effect of Conflict on Dietary Energy Supply: Evidence from Cote d'Ivoire," Discussion Papers 12/09, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food security; poverty; vulnerability; risk management; livelihoods; value-at-risk.;

    JEL classification:

    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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