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Endogenous Tradability and Macroeconomic Implications

  • Paul R. Bergin
  • Reuven Glick

International macroeconomic models long have had difficulty explaining the surprisingly low volatility of the relative price between traded and nontraded goods compared to real exchange rates. This apparent puzzle may reflect a restrictive way of thinking about the nature of nontraded goods. Rather than imposing an artificial dichotomy between traded and nontraded, we regard all goods as parts of a single continuum, where the margin between traded and nontraded is endogenous. This implies that their prices are linked together via a marginal good and a new equilibrium condition. A simple and transparent model is used to demonstrate this approach, featuring a small open economy where differentiated goods are heterogeneous in terms of their iceberg trade costs. The paper goes on to find implications for other basic macroeconomic issues, such as limiting the potency of real exchange rate movements to correct large current account imbalances.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 9739.

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Date of creation: Jun 2003
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9739
Note: IFM
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  1. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2000. "The Six Major Puzzles in International Macroeconomics: Is There a Common Cause?," Center for International and Development Economics Research, Working Paper Series qt0sx02651, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
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  13. Paul R. Bergin & Reuven Glick, 2003. "Endogenous Tradability and Macroeconomic Implications," NBER Working Papers 9739, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Charles Engel, 1992. "Real Exchange Rates and Relative Prices: An Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers 4231, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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