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Endogenous nontradability and macroeconomic implications

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  • Paul R. Bergin
  • Reuven Glick

Abstract

This paper advocates a new way of thinking about goods trade in an open economy macro model. It develops a simple method for analyzing trade costs that are heterogeneous among a continuum of goods, and it explores how these costs determine the endogenous decision by a seller of whether to trade a good internationally. This way of thinking offers new insights into international market integration and the behavior of international relative prices. As one example, it provides a natural explanation for a prominent and controversial puzzle in international macroeconomics regarding the surprisingly low degree of volatility in the relative price of nontraded goods. Because tradedness is an endogenous decision, the good on the margin forms a link holding together the prices of traded and nontraded goods. The paper goes on to find that endogenizing trade has implications for other basic macroeconomic issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul R. Bergin & Reuven Glick, 2005. "Endogenous nontradability and macroeconomic implications," Working Paper Series 2003-09, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfwp:2003-09
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bruha, Jan & Podpiera, Jirí & Polák, Stanislav, 2010. "The convergence dynamics of a transition economy: The case of the Czech Republic," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 116-124, January.
    2. Giancarlo Corsetti & Paolo Pesenti, 2009. "The Simple Geometry of Transmission and Stabilization in Closed and Open Economies," NBER Chapters,in: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2007, pages 65-116 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Giorgio Fazio & Ronald MacDonald & Jacques Melitz, 2008. "Trade Costs, Trade Balances and Current Accounts: An Application of Gravity to Multilateral Trade," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 19(5), pages 557-578, November.
    4. Andrew Atkeson & Ariel Burstein, 2008. "Pricing-to-Market, Trade Costs, and International Relative Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(5), pages 1998-2031, December.
    5. Fabio Ghironi & Marc J. Melitz, 2005. "International Trade and Macroeconomic Dynamics with Heterogeneous Firms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(3), pages 865-915.
    6. Cacciatore, Matteo, 2014. "International trade and macroeconomic dynamics with labor market frictions," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 17-30.
    7. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Martin, Philippe & Pesenti, Paolo, 2005. "Productivity Spillovers, Terms of Trade and the 'Home Market Effect'," CEPR Discussion Papers 4964, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Naknoi, Kanda, 2008. "Real exchange rate fluctuations, endogenous tradability and exchange rate regimes," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 645-663, April.
    9. Dennis Novy, 2010. "Trade Costs and the Open Macroeconomy," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 112(3), pages 514-545, September.
    10. Paul R. Bergin & Reuven Glick & Alan M. Taylor, 2017. "Productivity, Tradability, and the Long-Run Price Puzzle," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: International Macroeconomic Interdependence, chapter 8, pages 211-248 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    11. Rebecca L Driver & Peter F Westaway, 2005. "Concepts of equilibrium exchange rates," Bank of England working papers 248, Bank of England.
    12. Luca Guerrieri & Dale W. Henderson & Jinill Kim, 2005. "Investment-specific and multifactor productivity in multi-sector open economies: data and analysis," International Finance Discussion Papers 828, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    13. Giancarlo Corsetti & Philippe Martin & Paolo Pesenti, 2008. "Varieties and the Transfer Problem: The Extensive Margin of Current Account Adjustment," RSCAS Working Papers 2008/01, European University Institute.
    14. Katheryn N. Russ & Thomas A. Lubik, 2006. "Entry, Multinational Firms, and Exchange Rate Volatility," Working Papers 157, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
    15. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Martin, Philippe & Pesenti, Paolo, 2007. "Productivity, terms of trade and the `home market effect'," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 99-127, September.
    16. Torben M. Andersen, 2007. "Fiscal Policy Coordination and International Trade," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(294), pages 235-257, May.
    17. Kanda Naknoi, 2005. "Real Exchange Rate Fluctuations and Endogenous Tradability," 2005 Meeting Papers 857, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    18. Novy, Dennis, 2006. "Is the Iceberg Melting Less Quickly? International Trade Costs after World War II," Economic Research Papers 269734, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
    19. Kanda Naknoi & Michael Kumhof & Douglas Laxton, 2005. "On the Benefits of Exchange Rate Flexibility under Endogenous Tradedness of Goods," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 405, Society for Computational Economics.
    20. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/9244 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Brůha, Jan & Podpiera, Jiří, 2007. "Transition economy convergence in a two-country model: implications for monetary integration," Working Paper Series 740, European Central Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trade ; Macroeconomics ; Foreign exchange rates;

    JEL classification:

    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance

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