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Capital Mobility in a Second Best World -- Moral Hazard With Costly Financial Intermediation

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  • Joshua Aizenman

Abstract

This paper studies the welfare effects of financial integration in the presence of moral hazard. Entrepreneurs face a trade off between risk and return. Banks may mitigate the resultant excessive risk by costly monitoring, where greater risk reduction requires more resources devoted to risk supervision. Hence, the excessive risk associated with moral hazard is endogenously determined. We show that a drop in banks' cost of funds increases the risk tolerated by banks in a competitive equilibrium. Similarly, less efficient intermediation technology (i.e. more costly risk monitoring), higher macroeconomic volatility, and a more generous deposit insurance all raise the riskiness of projects in a competitive equilibrium. Overborrowing would arise e insurance in circumstances where the cost of financial intermediation is relatively high, the banks' cost of funds is relatively low, and macroeconomic volatility is high. With relative scarcity of funds, financial integration is welfare reducing (enhancing) if the financial intermediation is relatively inefficient (efficient). The association between financial integration and welfare may be non-monotonic. For a large enough cost of financial intermediation, the dependence of welfare on the banks' cost of funds has an inverted U shape. For such an economy, financial integration and reforming the banking sector are complimentary policies, as the gain of each reform is magnified by the second. If one starts with a highly inefficient banking system, reforming it and improving its operation is a precondition for s

Suggested Citation

  • Joshua Aizenman, 1998. "Capital Mobility in a Second Best World -- Moral Hazard With Costly Financial Intermediation," NBER Working Papers 6703, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:6703 Note: IFM
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dooley, Michael P, 2000. "A Model of Crises in Emerging Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(460), pages 256-272, January.
    2. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Joshua Aizenman, 1998. "Contagion and Volatility with Imperfect Credit Markets," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(2), pages 207-235, June.
    3. Takatoshi Ito & Anne O. Krueger, 1996. "Financial Deregulation and Integration in East Asia, NBER-EASE Volume 5," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number ito_96-1, January.
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    7. Jaffee, Dwight & Stiglitz, Joseph, 1990. "Credit rationing," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: B. M. Friedman & F. H. Hahn (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 16, pages 837-888 Elsevier.
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    Cited by:

    1. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Aizenman, Joshua, 1998. "Volatility and the welfare costs of financial market integration," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1974, The World Bank.
    2. Buch, Claudia M., 1999. "Chilean-type capital controls: A building block of the new international financial architecture?," Kiel Discussion Papers 350, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. Claudia M. Buch & Stefan M. Golder, 2000. "Foreign competition and disintermediation: no threat to the German banking system?," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 53(213), pages 107-133.
    4. Buiter, Willem H. & Sibert, Anne, 1999. "UDROP: A Small Contribution to the New International Financial Architecture," CEPR Discussion Papers 2138, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Dominic Wilson, 2001. "Managing Capital Flows: A Distortions Approach," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 312, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    6. Cécile Bastidon, 2002. "Financement extérieur des Pays en Développement : une revue de la littérature des modèles de dette et de crises financières," Post-Print hal-00730937, HAL.
    7. Claudia M. Buch, 2000. "Capital Market Integration in Euroland: The Role of Banks," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 1(4), pages 443-464, November.
    8. Buch, Claudia M. & Golder, Stefan M., 2001. "Foreign versus domestic banks in Germany and the US: a tale of two markets?," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 11(4-5), pages 341-361, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business

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