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Income-based Inequality in Educational Outcomes: Learning from State Longitudinal Data Systems

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  • John P. Papay
  • Richard J. Murnane
  • John B. Willett

Abstract

We report results from our long-standing research partnership with the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. We make two primary contributions. First, we illustrate the wide range of informative analyses that can be conducted using a state longitudinal data system and the advantages of examining evidence from multiple cohorts of students. Second, we document large income-based gaps in educational attainments, including high-school graduation rates and college-going. Importantly, we show that income-related gaps in both educational credentials and academic skill have narrowed substantially over the past several years in Massachusetts.

Suggested Citation

  • John P. Papay & Richard J. Murnane & John B. Willett, 2014. "Income-based Inequality in Educational Outcomes: Learning from State Longitudinal Data Systems," NBER Working Papers 20802, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:20802
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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