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Nudges and Learning: Evidence from Informational Interventions for Low-Income Taxpayers

Author

Listed:
  • Dayanand S. Manoli
  • Nicholas Turner

Abstract

Can one-time informational interventions cause permanent changes in benefit take-up? In the context the Earned Income Tax Credit, we find evidence that reminding individuals of their eligibility has meaningful effects. Reminder notices have the largest effect among taxpayers without kids, persuading nearly 80 percent of taxpayers in the notice year to claim the credit. The effect of the notice quickly attenuates to roughly 22 percent only one year later. We find that this pattern holds across two experimental settings, one that tests the effect of being sent a notice and one that tests variations in the content of the notices.

Suggested Citation

  • Dayanand S. Manoli & Nicholas Turner, 2014. "Nudges and Learning: Evidence from Informational Interventions for Low-Income Taxpayers," NBER Working Papers 20718, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:20718
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Spencer Bastani & Thomas Giebe & Chizheng Miao, 2019. "Ethnicity and tax filing behavior," CESifo Working Paper Series 7576, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Mascagni, Giulia & Mengistu, Andualem T. & Woldeyes, Firew B., 2018. "Can ICTs Increase Tax? Experimental Evidence from Ethiopia," Working Papers 13845, Institute of Development Studies, International Centre for Tax and Development.
    3. Giulia Mascagni, 2018. "From The Lab To The Field: A Review Of Tax Experiments," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(2), pages 273-301, April.
    4. Jeffrey Clemens, 2016. "Redistribution through Minimum Wage Regulation: An Analysis of Program Linkages and Budgetary Spillovers," Tax Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(1), pages 163-189.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household

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