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How Families View and Use the EITC: Advanced Payment versus Lump-sum Delivery

Author

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  • Jennifer L. Romich
  • Thomas Weisner

Abstract

Updated March 25, 2001 A revised version of this paper appears as "How Families View and Use the EITC: The Case for Lump-sum Delivery." National Tax Journal 53(4) (part 2): 1107-1134. For more information see www.ntanet.org. We analyze ethnographic data on 42 families? perceptions and uses of the EITC, including the decision to use the lump sum or advance payment form. A behavioral life cycle (BLC) model lends a theoretical framework and a description of family financial situations provides context. Parents discuss and exhibit a strong preference for a lump sum combined tax refund and EITC over the credit?s advance payment option. We argue that the preference aligns with the BLC model and is rational given scarce time, money and personal energy. We conclude with implications and hypotheses for quantitative investigation of labor supply and well being issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Jennifer L. Romich & Thomas Weisner, 2000. "How Families View and Use the EITC: Advanced Payment versus Lump-sum Delivery," JCPR Working Papers 138, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:wop:jopovw:138
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    Cited by:

    1. Alex Rees-Jones & Dmitry Taubinsky, 2016. "Heuristic Perceptions of the Income Tax: Evidence and Implications for Debiasing," NBER Working Papers 22884, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Nicole Simpson & Devin Reilly & Kartik Athreya, 2010. "The Earned Income Tax Credit: Insurance Without Disincentives?," 2010 Meeting Papers 1103, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Nada Eissa & Hilary W. Hoynes, 2006. "Behavioral Responses to Taxes: Lessons from the EITC and Labor Supply," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 20, pages 73-110 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Katie Fitzpatrick, 2015. "Does “Banking the Unbanked” Help Families to Save? Evidence from the United Kingdom," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 223-249, March.
    5. Tzu-Ting Yang, 2016. "Family Labor Supply and the Timing of Cash Transfers: Evidence from the Earned Income Tax Credit," IEAS Working Paper : academic research 16-A012, Institute of Economics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
    6. Leigh Andrew, 2010. "Who Benefits from the Earned Income Tax Credit? Incidence among Recipients, Coworkers and Firms," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-43, May.
    7. Emma Tominey, 2010. "The Timing of Parental Income and Child Outcomes: The Role of Permanent and Transitory Shocks," CEE Discussion Papers 0120, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    8. V. Joseph Hotz, 2003. "The Earned Income Tax Credit," NBER Chapters,in: Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, pages 141-198 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Gunter, Samara, 2013. "State Earned Income Tax Credits and Participation in Regular and Informal Work," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 66(1), pages 33-62, March.
    10. Kartik B. Athreya & Devin Reilly & Nicole B. Simpson, 2010. "Earned income tax credit recipients: income, marginal tax rates, wealth, and credit constraints," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue 3Q, pages 229-258.
    11. repec:bla:jconsa:v:51:y:2017:i:1:p:3-26 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Sven Stöwhase, 2011. "Non-minimization of source taxes on labor income: empirical evidence from Germany," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 293-306, June.
    13. Sven Stöwhase, 2011. "Non-minimization of source taxes on labor income: empirical evidence from Germany," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 293-306, June.
    14. Dayanand S. Manoli & Nicholas Turner, 2014. "Nudges and Learning: Evidence from Informational Interventions for Low-Income Taxpayers," NBER Working Papers 20718, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Nicole Simpson & Jill Tiefenthaler & Jameson Hyde, 2010. "The Impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit on Economic Well-Being: A Comparison Across Household Types," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 29(6), pages 843-864, December.
    16. Tucker, Jenna N. & Key, Clinton C. & Grinstein-Weiss, Michal, 2014. "The benefits of saving at tax time: Evidence from the $aveNYC evaluation," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 50-61.
    17. Damon Jones, 2010. "Information, Preferences, and Public Benefit Participation: Experimental Evidence from the Advance EITC and 401(k) Savings," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 147-163, April.
    18. Clinton Key & Jenna N. Tucker & Michal Grinstein-Weiss & Krista Comer, 2015. "Tax-Time Savings among Low-Income Households in the $aveNYC Program," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 489-518, November.
    19. Dutko, Paula & Ver Ploeg, Michele & Farrigan, Tracey L., 2012. "Retail Wastelands: Characteristics and Influential Factors of Food Deserts," 2012 AAEA/EAAE Food Environment Symposium, May 30-31, Boston, MA 123201, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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