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Empirical Determinants of Intertemporal Choice

  • Jeffrey R. Brown
  • Zoran Ivković
  • Scott Weisbenner

We study the empirical determinants of intertemporal choice by analyzing a unique decision Croatian retirees made recently about whether to accept an immediate pension payment or a larger stream of delayed payments. Individual decisions are correlated in sensible ways with income, liquidity constraints, longevity expectations, and other covariates. Attitudes toward government also matter: those less confident that the government will honor its commitments are more likely to take the immediate stream of payments. Those who believe it is important to receive "the full amount due, no matter how long it takes" are substantially more likely to take the delayed payments.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 18755.

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Date of creation: Feb 2013
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Publication status: published as Journal of Financial Economics Volume 116, Issue 3, June 2015, Pages 473–486 Cover image Empirical determinants of intertemporal choice ☆ Jeffrey R. Browna, c, , , Zoran Ivkovićb, Scott Weisbennera, c
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18755
Note: AG PE
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  1. Joel Slemrod, 2002. "Trust in Public Finance," NBER Working Papers 9187, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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