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Who is Eager to Save for Retirement – the Cross-Country Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Anna Kaliciak

    ()

  • Radoslaw Kurach

    ()

  • Walid Merouani

    ()

Abstract

In this study we challenge the problem of inadequate voluntary pension saving looking for its behavioural determinants. By exploring the Luxembourg Wealth Study dataset for four countries (Greece, Italy, United Kingdom and United States) we argue that financial risk aversion and intertemporal choices significantly affect the individuals? propensity to save for retirement. Moreover, we verify the links between these two behavioural factors and sociodemographic characteristics of the investigated societies which should have practical implications for regulatory framework.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Kaliciak & Radoslaw Kurach & Walid Merouani, 2016. "Who is Eager to Save for Retirement – the Cross-Country Evidence," LWS Working papers 23, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
  • Handle: RePEc:lis:lwswps:23
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    supplementary pension savings; risk aversion; intertemporal choices; sociodemographic factors; retirement; retired;

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions

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