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Can the European Community Afford to Neglect the Need for More Accountable Safety-Net Management?


  • Edward J. Kane


As financial institutions and markets transact more and more cross-border business, gaps and flaws in national safety nets become more consequential. Because citizens of host (home) countries may be made to pay for mistakes made in the home (host) country, Basel's lead-regulator paradigm violates the principle of democratic accountability. Because important differences exist in policymaking authority, instruments, and goals, banking supervisors need to improve their ability to monitor and mitigate the consequences of defects in one another's performance. A straightforward way to enhance both capacities would be to establish opportunities for public trading in debt obligations and reinsurance derivatives issued by country-level deposit-insurance entities.

Suggested Citation

  • Edward J. Kane, 2005. "Can the European Community Afford to Neglect the Need for More Accountable Safety-Net Management?," NBER Working Papers 11860, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11860
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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hutchison, Michael M, 2002. " European Banking Distress and EMU: Institutional and Macroeconomic Risks," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 104(3), pages 365-389, September.
    2. Kane, Edward J., 2003. "What kind of multinational deposit-insurance arrangements might best enhance world welfare?," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 413-428, September.
    3. Schüler, Martin, 2003. "How Do Banking Supervisors Deal with Europe-wide Systemic Risk?," ZEW Discussion Papers 03-03, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    4. Xavier Vives, 2001. "Restructuring Financial Regulation in the European Monetary Union," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 19(1), pages 57-82, February.
    5. William N. Goetzmann & Lingfeng Li & K. Geert Rouwenhorst, 2005. "Long-Term Global Market Correlations," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 78(1), pages 1-38, January.
    6. Asli Demirguc-Kunt & Edward J. Kane, 2002. "Deposit Insurance Around the Globe: Where Does It Work?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 175-195, Spring.
    7. Mario Draghi & Francesco Giavazzi & Robert C. Merton, 2003. "Transparency, Risk Management and International Financial Fragility," NBER Working Papers 9806, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Demirgüç-Kunt, Asli & Kane, Edward J. & Laeven, Luc, 2008. "Determinants of deposit-insurance adoption and design," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 407-438, July.
    9. Calomiris, Charles W., 1990. "Is Deposit Insurance Necessary? A Historical Perspective," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 50(02), pages 283-295, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kane, Edward J., 2006. "Inadequacy of nation-based and VaR-based safety nets in the European Union," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 375-387, December.
    2. Gillian G. H. Garcia & Maria J. Nieto, 2007. "Preserving Financial Stability: A Dilemma For The European Union," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 25(3), pages 444-458, July.

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    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • P51 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Analysis of Economic Systems

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