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A Global View of Economic Growth

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  • Jaume Ventura

Abstract

This paper integrates in a unified and tractable framework some of the key insights of the field of international trade and economic growth. It examines a sequence of theoretical models that share a common description of technology and preferences but differ on their assumptions about trade frictions. By comparing the predictions of these models against each other, it is possible to identify a variety of channels through which trade affects the evolution of world income and its geographical distribution. By comparing the predictions of these models against the data, it is also possible to construct coherent explanations of income differences and long-run trends in economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Jaume Ventura, 2005. "A Global View of Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 11296, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11296
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    Cited by:

    1. Lutz Arnold, 2007. "A generalized multi-country endogenous growth model," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 61-100, April.
    2. Bretschger, Lucas, 2010. "Taxes, mobile capital, and economic dynamics in a globalizing world," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 594-605, June.
    3. Kym Anderson, 2005. "On the Virtues of Multilateral Trade Negotiations," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 81(255), pages 414-438, December.
    4. Schiffbauer, Marc, 2006. "Theoretical and methodological study on the role of public policies in fostering innovation and growth," Papers DYNREG04, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    5. Alberto Martin & Jaume Ventura, 2012. "Economic Growth with Bubbles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(6), pages 3033-3058, October.
    6. Gino Gancia & Andreas Müller & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2010. "Structural development accounting," Economics Working Papers 1249, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Feb 2011.
    7. Ioannides, Yannis M., 2015. "Neighborhoods to nations via social interactions," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 5-15.
    8. Rose, Andrew K., 2006. "Size really doesn't matter: In search of a national scale effect," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 482-507, December.
    9. Jaume Ventura, 2012. "Comment on "How Do Laffer Curves Differ Across Countries?"," NBER Chapters,in: Fiscal Policy after the Financial Crisis, pages 249-253 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Antonio Ciccone & Elias Papaioannou, 2009. "Human Capital, the Structure of Production, and Growth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(1), pages 66-82, February.
    11. Furceri, Davide & Karras, Georgios, 2007. "Country size and business cycle volatility: Scale really matters," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 424-434, December.
    12. Francis Breedon & Thórarinn Pétursson & Andrew Rose, 2012. "Exchange Rate Policy in Small Rich Economies," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 421-445, July.
    13. Fadinger, Harald, 2011. "Productivity differences in an interdependent world," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 221-232, July.
    14. Mino, Kazuo, 2008. "Financial integration and volatility in a two-country world," MPRA Paper 16953, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Fernando Broner & Jaume Ventura, 2011. "Globalization and Risk Sharing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 78(1), pages 49-82.
    16. Yunfang Hu & Murray Kemp & Koji Shimomura, 2009. "A two-country dynamic Heckscher–Ohlin model with physical and human capital accumulation," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 41(1), pages 67-84, October.
    17. Yannis M. Ioannides, 2008. "Intercity Trade and Convergent versus Divergent Urban Growth," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0723, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    18. Andrew K. Rose, 2006. "Size Really Doesn't Matter: In Search of a National Scale Effect," NBER Working Papers 12191, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Cavusoglu, Nevin, 2012. "LISREL growth model on direct and indirect effects using cross-country data," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2362-2370.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F40 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - General
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies

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