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Rich and Poor Countries in Neoclassical Trade and Growth

Author

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  • Deardorff, A.V.

Abstract

A neoclassical growth model is used to provide an explanation for a "poverty trap," or "club convergence," in terms of specialization and international trade. The model has a large number of countries with access to identical constant-returns-to-scale technologies for producing and trading three goods using capital and labor.

Suggested Citation

  • Deardorff, A.V., 1997. "Rich and Poor Countries in Neoclassical Trade and Growth," Working Papers 402, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:mie:wpaper:402
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    8. Alan V. Deardorff, 2011. "The Gains From Trade In And Out Of Steady -State Growth," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Robert M Stern (ed.), Comparative Advantage, Growth, And The Gains From Trade And Globalization A Festschrift in Honor of Alan V Deardorff, chapter 21, pages 217-236, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    9. Alan V. Deardorff, 2011. "Rich And Poor Countries In Neoclassical Trade And Growth," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Robert M Stern (ed.), Comparative Advantage, Growth, And The Gains From Trade And Globalization A Festschrift in Honor of Alan V Deardorff, chapter 25, pages 295-313, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
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    13. Alan V. Deardorff, 2011. "A geometry of growth and trade," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Robert M Stern (ed.), Comparative Advantage, Growth, And The Gains From Trade And Globalization A Festschrift in Honor of Alan V Deardorff, chapter 22, pages 237-249, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    INTERNATIONAL TRADE ; ECONOMIC GROWTH ; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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