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Offshoring and migration in a world with policy spillovers

Author

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  • Cosimo BEVERELLI

    ()

  • Gianluca OREFICE

    ()

  • Nadia ROCHA

    ()

Abstract

Using a trade in task model that extends the one of Ottaviano, Peri, and Wright (2010) to three countries, we study the effects of immigration and offshoring costs on employment. Tasks can be performed by migrants, offshore workers or natives, with sorting along a continuum of task determined by cost minimization. For two alternative specifications of the model - one in which the ordering of low-end and intermediate tasks is pinned down by worker characteristic and one in which it is pinned down by country characteristics - we derive testable predictions on `direct', `domestic spillover' and `international spillover' effects of migration and offshoring costs on the number of migrants and the number of offshore workers. Direct effects refer to the impact of own migration (offshoring) costs on number of migrant (offshore) workers. Domestic spillovers capture the effect of own migration (offshoring) costs on the number of offshore (migrant) workers. International spillovers refer to the direct effect of country j's migration (offshoring) costs on country i's migration (offhoring), and to the indirect effect of country j's migration (offshoring) costs on country i's offshoring (migration). Overall, we find strong support of negative direct effects, mild support for domestic spillover effects and very limited support for international spillover effect, leading to conclude that the second model specification is a better fit of the data. Two broad policy implications follow. First, host countries can affect the number of migrants by acting both on bilateral migration policies and on bilateral offshoring policies. Second, de jure discriminatory policies on migration or offshoring need not be de facto so.

Suggested Citation

  • Cosimo BEVERELLI & Gianluca OREFICE & Nadia ROCHA, 2011. "Offshoring and migration in a world with policy spillovers," Departmental Working Papers 2011-25, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  • Handle: RePEc:mil:wpdepa:2011-25
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    File URL: http://wp.demm.unimi.it/files/wp/2011/DEMM-2011_025wp.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Heather Antecol & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Stephen J. Trejo, 2003. "Immigration Policy and the Skills of Immigrants to Australia, Canada, and the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(1).
    2. Javorcik, Beata S. & Özden, Çaglar & Spatareanu, Mariana & Neagu, Cristina, 2011. "Migrant networks and foreign direct investment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 231-241, March.
    3. Subhayu Bandyopadhyay & Howard J. Wall, 2010. "Immigration and Outsourcing: A General-Equilibrium Analysis," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(s1), pages 433-446, August.
    4. Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano & Giovanni Peri & Greg C. Wright, 2016. "Immigration, Offshoring, and American Jobs," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Economics of International Migration, chapter 4, pages 117-151 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    5. Abdih, Yasser & Chami, Ralph & Dagher, Jihad & Montiel, Peter, 2012. "Remittances and Institutions: Are Remittances a Curse?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 657-666.
    6. William W. Olney, 2013. "Immigration And Firm Expansion," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(1), pages 142-157, February.
    7. Antonio Ciccone & Giovanni Peri, 2005. "Long-Run Substitutability Between More and Less Educated Workers: Evidence from U.S. States, 1950-1990," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(4), pages 652-663, November.
    8. Alan S. Blinder & Alan B. Krueger, 2013. "Alternative Measures of Offshorability: A Survey Approach," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(S1), pages 97-128.
    9. Kristin F. Butcher & John Dinardo, 2002. "The Immigrant and Native-Born Wage Distributions: Evidence from United States Censuses," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 56(1), pages 97-121, October.
    10. Giovanni Peri & Chad Sparber, 2016. "Task Specialization, Immigration, and Wages," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Economics of International Migration, chapter 3, pages 81-115 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    11. repec:pri:cepsud:190blinder is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Wright, Greg C., 2014. "Revisiting the employment impact of offshoring," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 63-83.
    13. Chiswick, Carmel U, 1985. "The Elasticity of Substitution Revisited: The Effects of Secular Changes in Labor Force Structure," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 490-507, October.
    14. Anna Mayda, 2010. "International migration: a panel data analysis of the determinants of bilateral flows," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(4), pages 1249-1274, September.
    15. Maurice Kugler & Hillel Rapoport, 2005. "Skilled Emigration, Business Networks and Foreign Direct Investment," CESifo Working Paper Series 1455, CESifo Group Munich.
    16. Oecd, 2006. "The Share of Employment Potentially Affected by Offshoring: An Empirical Investigation," OECD Digital Economy Papers 107, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hatzigeorgiou, Andreas & Karpaty, Patrik & Kneller, Richard & Lodefalk, Magnus, 2016. "Do Immigrants Spur Offshoring? Firm-Level Evidence," Ratio Working Papers 282, The Ratio Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trade in Tasks; employment; spillover effects;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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