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The Impact of Migration Policy on Migrants' Education Structure: Evidence from an Austrian Policy Reform

  • Petr Huber

    ()

    (Austrian Institute for Economic Research (WIFO), Arsenal, Objekt 20, 1030 Wien and Faculty of Business and Economics, Mendel University in Brno.)

  • Julia Bock-Schappelwein

    ()

    (Austrian Institute for Economic Research (WIFO), Arsenal, Objekt 20, 1030 Wien)

We ask how a reform of migration law intended to increase the selectivity of migration (the so-called integration agreement regulation in 2003) impacted on the education structure of migrants to Austria. To identify the effects of this reform, we use the fact it affected only migrants from third countries but not from EEA-countries. We find no compelling evidence that this regulation improved the education structure of migrants to Austria. Our interpretation of this is that the implicit positive impact of the reforms on the education structure of migrants was countervailed by an increased restrictiveness of the migration regime in total.

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Paper provided by Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Business and Economics in its series MENDELU Working Papers in Business and Economics with number 2013-35.

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Length: 24
Date of creation: Apr 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:men:wpaper:35_2013
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  1. Michel Beine & Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, . "Brain drain and human capital formation in developing countries: winners and losers?," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/10415, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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  12. Yiu Por Chen, 2005. "Skill-Sorting, Self-Selectivity, and Immigration Policy Regime Change: Two Surveys of Chinese Graduate Students' Intention to Study Abroad," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 66-70, May.
  13. Michael Greenwood & John McDowell, 2011. "USA immigration policy, source-country social programs, and the skill composition of legal USA immigration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 521-539, April.
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  15. Barrett, Alan, 2009. "EU Enlargement and Ireland's Labour Market," IZA Discussion Papers 4260, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  16. Peter Egger & Doina Maria Radulescu, 2009. "The Influence of Labour Taxes on the Migration of Skilled Workers," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(9), pages 1365-1379, 09.
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