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The Impact of Migration Policy on Migrants' Education Structure: Evidence from an Austrian Policy Reform

Author

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  • Petr Huber

    () (Austrian Institute for Economic Research (WIFO), Arsenal, Objekt 20, 1030 Wien and Faculty of Business and Economics, Mendel University in Brno.)

  • Julia Bock-Schappelwein

    () (Austrian Institute for Economic Research (WIFO), Arsenal, Objekt 20, 1030 Wien)

Abstract

We ask how a reform of migration law intended to increase the selectivity of migration (the so-called integration agreement regulation in 2003) impacted on the education structure of migrants to Austria. To identify the effects of this reform, we use the fact it affected only migrants from third countries but not from EEA-countries. We find no compelling evidence that this regulation improved the education structure of migrants to Austria. Our interpretation of this is that the implicit positive impact of the reforms on the education structure of migrants was countervailed by an increased restrictiveness of the migration regime in total.

Suggested Citation

  • Petr Huber & Julia Bock-Schappelwein, 2013. "The Impact of Migration Policy on Migrants' Education Structure: Evidence from an Austrian Policy Reform," MENDELU Working Papers in Business and Economics 2013-35, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Business and Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:men:wpaper:35_2013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Zuzana Machova & Igor Kotlan, 2014. "Expenditures on Collective and Individual Services: Discussion on the Classification of Government Expenditures with Regard to their Inclusion into Growth Models," DANUBE: Law and Economics Review, European Association Comenius - EACO, issue 4, pages 287-296, December.
    2. Peter Huber & Julia Bock-Schappelwein, 2013. "The Impact of Migration Policy on Migrants’ Education Structure: Evidence from Austrian Policy Reform," DANUBE: Law and Economics Review, European Association Comenius - EACO, issue 1, pages 1-21, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration Policy; Self-Selection; European Economic Area;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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