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High Skilled Immigration in the International Arena

  • Chiswick, Barry R.

    ()

    (George Washington University)

This conceptual paper, prepared for a United Nations Expert Group Meeting on Migration and Development, is concerned with the international mobility of high-skilled workers, previously referred to as the "brain drain". After discussing the historical background of high-skilled international migration, the paper examines the reasons for the recent growth in demand for high-skilled workers in the technologically advanced nations. If then examines the impact of high-skilled migration on the level and distribution of income in the destinations. The causes and consequences of high-skilled emigration from the perspective of the origins or sending countries are examined. Educational finance and taxing policies that encourage emigration, emigrant remittances, and the "brain gain" from returning emigrants are discussed. Alternative public policies are considered.

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File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp1782.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 1782.

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Length: 11 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2005
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: T.R. Shastri (ed.), Emigration: Economic Implications, Icfai University Press, India, 2007, 84-95
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1782
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  1. Jeremy Greenwood, 1997. "The Third Industrial Revolution," Books, American Enterprise Institute, number 53059, 6.
  2. Barry Chiswick & Timothy J.. Hatton, 2003. "International Migration and the Integration of Labor Markets," NBER Chapters, in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 65-120 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Greenwood, Jeremy & Hercowitz, Zvi & Krusell, Per, 1997. "Long-Run Implications of Investment-Specific Technological Change," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 342-62, June.
  4. David, Paul A, 1985. "Clio and the Economics of QWERTY," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 332-37, May.
  5. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-46, September.
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