IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/iza/izadps/dp1782.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

High Skilled Immigration in the International Arena

Author

Listed:
  • Chiswick, Barry R.

    () (George Washington University)

Abstract

This conceptual paper, prepared for a United Nations Expert Group Meeting on Migration and Development, is concerned with the international mobility of high-skilled workers, previously referred to as the "brain drain". After discussing the historical background of high-skilled international migration, the paper examines the reasons for the recent growth in demand for high-skilled workers in the technologically advanced nations. If then examines the impact of high-skilled migration on the level and distribution of income in the destinations. The causes and consequences of high-skilled emigration from the perspective of the origins or sending countries are examined. Educational finance and taxing policies that encourage emigration, emigrant remittances, and the "brain gain" from returning emigrants are discussed. Alternative public policies are considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Chiswick, Barry R., 2005. "High Skilled Immigration in the International Arena," IZA Discussion Papers 1782, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1782
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp1782.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Barry Chiswick & Timothy J. Hatton, 2003. "International Migration and the Integration of Labor Markets," NBER Chapters,in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 65-120 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. David, Paul A, 1985. "Clio and the Economics of QWERTY," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 332-337, May.
    3. Jeremy Greenwood, 1999. "The Third Industrial Revolution," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Q II, pages 2-12.
    4. Greenwood, Jeremy & Hercowitz, Zvi & Krusell, Per, 1997. "Long-Run Implications of Investment-Specific Technological Change," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 342-362, June.
    5. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-846, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Peter Huber, 2012. "Do commuters suffer from job--education mismatch?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(4), pages 349-352, March.
    2. Milo Bianchi, 2013. "Immigration Policy and Self-Selecting Migrants," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 15(1), pages 1-23, February.
    3. Stolz, Yvonne & Baten, Joerg, 2012. "Brain drain in the age of mass migration: Does relative inequality explain migrant selectivity?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 205-220.
    4. Peter Huber & Julia Bock-Schappelwein, 2012. "The Impact of Migration Policy on Migrants' Education Structure. Evidence from Two Austrian Policy Experiments," WIFO Working Papers 428, WIFO.
    5. Sean Archer, 2007. "The International Literature on Skills Training and the Scope for South African Application," Working Papers 07124, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    6. Alexander Kemnitz, 2009. "Native welfare losses from high skilled immigration," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 16(4), pages 560-570, August.
    7. repec:wfo:wstudy:41226 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Peter Huber & Doris A. Oberdabernig, 2016. "Decomposing Welfare Wedges: An Analysis of Welfare Dependence of Immigrants and Natives in Europe," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(1), pages 82-107, February.
    9. Peter Huber & Klaus Nowotny & Julia Bock-Schappelwein, 2010. "Qualification Structure, Over- and Under-qualification of the Foreign Born in Austria and the EU," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 41226.
    10. Bonin, Holger, 2017. "Report No. 75: The Potential Economic Benefits of Education of Migrants in the EU," IZA Research Reports 75, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Peter Huber & Julia Bock-Schappelwein, 2014. "The Effects of Liberalizing Migration on Permanent Migrants' Education Structure," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 268-284, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    high skilled workers; economic development; immigration;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1782. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Fallak). General contact details of provider: http://www.iza.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.