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Private provision of public goods: Do individual climate protection efforts depend on perceptions of climate policy?

Author

Listed:
  • Joachim Schleich

    (University of Karlsruhe)

  • Claudia Schwirplies

    (University of Kassel)

  • Andreas Ziegler

    (University of Kassel)

Abstract

This paper extends the economic literature on the private provision of public goods by examining the relevance of perceptions of climate policy to voluntary contributions to the public good of climate protection. Based on an analytical model which allows for perceptions of climate policy such as justification of international climate policy, procedural trust and procedural justice to affect voluntary climate protection activities, we examined data from representative surveys among citizens in the USA and Germany. Our microeconometric analysis confirmed the prediction that the perceived justification of international climate policy is positively related to voluntary contributions to climate protection in both countries. We also found empirical support (mainly for the USA) that higher perceived procedural justice lowers citizens' propensity to adopt climate protection activities. In contrast, we found no support that higher perceived procedural trust reduces citizens' propensity to adopt such measures. In a broad interpretation, our empirical results imply that individuals' perceptions about the process of providing public goods should also be considered when analyzing the factors explaining voluntary individual contribution to public goods.

Suggested Citation

  • Joachim Schleich & Claudia Schwirplies & Andreas Ziegler, 2014. "Private provision of public goods: Do individual climate protection efforts depend on perceptions of climate policy?," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201453, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
  • Handle: RePEc:mar:magkse:201453
    as

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    File URL: https://www.uni-marburg.de/fb02/makro/forschung/magkspapers/53-2014_ziegler.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Ziegler, 2015. "On the relevance of ideological identification and environmental values for beliefs and attitudes toward climate change: An empirical cross country analysis," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201516, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    2. repec:eee:eneeco:v:63:y:2017:i:c:p:144-153 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ziegler, Andreas, 2015. "On the relevance of ideology and environmental values for climate change beliefs, climate policy support, and climate protection activities: An empirical cross country analysis," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112918, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Public good; voluntary contribution; perceptions of international climate policy; climate protection activities;

    JEL classification:

    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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