IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Citizens' perceptions of justice in international climate policy: Empirical insights from China, Germany and the US

  • Schleich, Joachim
  • Dütschke, Elisabeth
  • Schwirplies, Claudia
  • Ziegler, Andreas

Relying on a recent survey of more than 3300 participants from China, Germany and the US, this paper empirically analyzes citizens' perceptions of climate change and climate policy, focusing on key guiding principles for sharing mitigation costs across countries. The ranking of the main principles for burden-sharing is identical in China, Germany and the US: accountability followed by capability, egalitarianism, and sovereignty. Thus, on a general level, citizens across these countries seem to have a common understanding of fairness. We therefore find no evidence that citizens' (stated) fairness preferences are detrimental to future burden-sharing agreements. While there is heterogeneity in citizens' perceptions of climate change and climate policy within and across countries, a substantial portion of citizens in all countries perceive a lack of transparency, fairness, and trust in international climate agreements.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/92413/1/778260615.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI) in its series Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" with number S2/2014.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:zbw:fisisi:s22014
Contact details of provider: Postal: Breslauer Straße 48, D-76139 Karlsruhe
Phone: 0721/6809-0
Fax: 0721/689152
Web page: http://isi.fraunhofer.de/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Adam Rose & Brandt Stevens & Jae Edmonds & Marshall Wise, 1998. "International Equity and Differentiation in Global Warming Policy," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 12(1), pages 25-51, July.
  2. Chukwumerije Okereke & Harriet Bulkeley & Heike Schroeder, 2009. "Conceptualizing Climate Governance Beyond the International Regime," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 9(1), pages 58-78, February.
  3. Lasse Ringius & Asbjørn Torvanger & Arild Underdal, 2002. "Burden Sharing and Fairness Principles in International Climate Policy," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 1-22, March.
  4. Carlsson, Fredrik & Kataria, Mitesh & Krupnick, Alan & Lampi, Elina & Löfgren, Åsa & Qin, Ping & Sterner, Thomas, 2013. "A fair share: Burden-sharing preferences in the United States and China," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-17.
  5. van Ruijven, Bas J. & Weitzel, Matthias & den Elzen, Michel G.J. & Hof, Andries F. & van Vuuren, Detlef P. & Peterson, Sonja & Narita, Daiju, 2012. "Emission allowances and mitigation costs of China and India resulting from different effort-sharing approaches," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 116-134.
  6. Torgler, Benno & Garcia-Valinas, Maria A., 2007. "The determinants of individuals' attitudes towards preventing environmental damage," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2-3), pages 536-552, August.
  7. Andreas Lange & Andreas Löschel & Carsten Vogt & Andreas Ziegler, 2009. "On the Self-interested Use of Equity in International Climate Negotiations," NBER Working Papers 14930, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Lange, Andreas & Vogt, Carsten & Ziegler, Andreas, 2007. "On the importance of equity in international climate policy: An empirical analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 545-562, May.
  9. Huifang Tian & Xiaojun Shi & John Whalley, 2012. "Cross Country Fairness Considerations and Country Implications of Alternative Approaches to a Global Emission Reduction Regime," NBER Working Papers 18443, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Mattoo, Aaditya & Subramanian, Arvind, 2010. "Equity in climate change: an analytical review," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5383, The World Bank.
  11. Oberholzer-Gee, Felix & Bohnet, Iris & Frey, Bruno S, 1997. " Fairness and Competence in Democratic Decisions," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 91(1), pages 89-105, April.
  12. Bosetti, Valentina & Frankel, Jeffrey A., 2011. "Politically Feasible Emission Target Formulas to Attain 460 ppm CO2 Concentrations," Scholarly Articles 4735391, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
  13. Frankel, Jeffrey A. & Bosetti, Valentina, 2011. "Politically Feasible Emission Target Formulas to Attain 460 ppm CO[subscript 2] Concentrations," Working Paper Series rwp11-016, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  14. Astrid Dannenberg & Bodo Sturm & Carsten Vogt, 2010. "Do Equity Preferences Matter for Climate Negotiators? An Experimental Investigation," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 47(1), pages 91-109, September.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:fisisi:s22014. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.