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Conceptualizing Climate Governance Beyond the International Regime

Author

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  • Chukwumerije Okereke

    (Chukwumerije Okereke is a Fellow both of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research in the School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, UK and the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment, University of Oxford, UK. His research addresses the links between ethics, political economic ideas and the governance structures of international institutions within the context of global sustainable development. He is the author of Global Justice and Neoliberal Environmental Governance (2008) and the editor of The Politics of the Environment (2007).)

  • Harriet Bulkeley

    (Harriet Bulkeley is a Reader in Geography at Durham University. Her research interests center on the concepts and practice of environmental governance, with a particular focus on cities, transnational networks and climate change. She is co-author (with Michele Betsill) of Cities and Climate Change (2003), and has published widely including articles in Political Geography, Environment and Planning A, International Studies Quarterly, and Environmental Politics. She currently holds an ESRC Climate Change Fellowship, co-ordinates the Leverhulme International Network Transnational Climate Change Governance, and in 2007 was awarded a Philip Leverhulme Prize in 2007.)

  • Heike Schroeder

    (Heike Schroeder is a Tyndall Research Fellow at the Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, where she is analyzing options for international action on climate change. Speciªcally, she is looking at possible roles of non-nation state actors and emerging countries in a post-2012 international policy framework. From 2003 to 2007, she was a researcher at the University of California, Santa Barbara and the Executive Ofªcer of a 10-year international research project on the Institutional Dimensions of Global Environmental Change (IDGEC), a core project of the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP). Her latest publications include Institutions and Environmental Change, coedited with O. R. Young and L. A. King (2008).)

Abstract

The governance of climate change has traditionally been conceived as an issue of international co-operation and considered through the lens of regime analysis. Increasingly, scholars of global governance have highlighted the multiple parallel initiatives involving a range of actors at different levels of governance through which this issue is being addressed. In this paper, we argue that this phenomenon warrants a re-engagement with some of the conceptual cornerstones of international studies. We highlight the conceptual challenges posed by the increasing involvement of non-nation-state actors (NNSAs) in the governance of climate change and explore the potential for drawing from alternative theoretical traditions to address these challenges. Specifically, the paper combines insights from neo-Gramscian and governmentality perspectives as a means of providing the critical space required to generate deeper understanding of: (a) the nature of power in global governance; (b) the relationship between public and private authority; (c) the dynamics between structure and agency; and (d) the rationalities and practices of governance. (c) 2009 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Chukwumerije Okereke & Harriet Bulkeley & Heike Schroeder, 2009. "Conceptualizing Climate Governance Beyond the International Regime," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 9(1), pages 58-78, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:glenvp:v:9:y:2009:i:1:p:58-78
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Schleich, Joachim & Dütschke, Elisabeth & Schwirplies, Claudia & Ziegler, Andreas, 2014. "Citizens' perceptions of justice in international climate policy: Empirical insights from China, Germany and the US," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S2/2014, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    2. Moritz Albrecht, 2012. "Public Procurement and Forest Governance: A German Case Study of Governmental Influences on Market-Driven Governance Systems," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 1(1), pages 1-20, September.
    3. Sofie Bouteligier, 2011. "Exploring the agency of global environmental consultancy firms in earth system governance," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 43-61, March.
    4. Michele Betsill & Philipp Pattberg & Eleni Dellas, 2011. "Editorial," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 1-6, March.
    5. repec:spr:ieaple:v:18:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10784-018-9398-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Christopher D. Gore, 2010. "The Limits and Opportunities of Networks: Municipalities and Canadian Climate Change Policy," Review of Policy Research, Policy Studies Organization, vol. 27(1), pages 27-46, January.
    7. Cristina A. Lucier & Brian J. Gareau, 2016. "Obstacles to preserving precaution and equity in global hazardous waste regulation: an analysis of contested knowledge in the Basel Convention," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 493-508, August.
    8. Heike Schroeder, 2010. "Agency in international climate negotiations: the case of indigenous peoples and avoided deforestation," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 317-332, December.
    9. Riikka Sievänen & John Sumelius & K. Islam & Mila Sell, 2013. "From struggle in responsible investment to potential to improve global environmental governance through UN PRI," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 197-217, May.
    10. Eleni Dellas & Philipp Pattberg & Michele Betsill, 2011. "Agency in earth system governance: refining a research agenda," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 85-98, March.
    11. repec:tpr:glenvp:v:17:y:2017:i:2:p:65-83 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Jieh-Jiuh Wang, 2013. "Post-disaster cross-nation mutual aid in natural hazards: case analysis from sociology of disaster and disaster politics perspectives," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 66(2), pages 413-438, March.
    13. Norichika Kanie & Hiromi Nishimoto & Yasuaki Hijioka & Yasuko Kameyama, 2010. "Allocation and architecture in climate governance beyond Kyoto: lessons from interdisciplinary research on target setting," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 299-315, December.
    14. Naghmeh Nasiritousi & Björn-Ola Linnér, 2016. "Open or closed meetings? Explaining nonstate actor involvement in the international climate change negotiations," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 127-144, February.
    15. Naghmeh Nasiritousi & Björn-Ola Linnér, 2016. "Open or closed meetings? Explaining nonstate actor involvement in the international climate change negotiations," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 127-144, February.
    16. Castán Broto, Vanesa, 2017. "Urban Governance and the Politics of Climate change," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 1-15.

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