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Education Language Choice and Youth Entrepreneurship in Chad

Author

Listed:
  • Douzounet Mallaye
  • Koulké Blandine Nan-Guer
  • Urbain Thierry Yogo
  • Eurydice Tormal Gosngar

Abstract

Using the third Chadian survey on consumption and the informal sector (ECOSIT III), this study aims to assess the relationship between education language choice and entrepreneurship in Chad. By education language choice, we mean the choice between education in Arabic and education in French. Specifically, the study seeks to evaluate the effect of language of instruction on self-employment. To achieve this objective, we make use of a recursive vicariate profit model to tackle the endogeneity of education choice. Moreover, the propensity score matching approach is also used to check for the robustness of results. Three main conclusions are derived from the analysis: first, those youth who choose Arabiclanguage education are more likely to be an entrepreneur. Second, youth are more likely to be self-employed in Chad. Third, the probability to be self-employed is higher for men than women. Based on this evidence, relevant recommendations are provided to help the Chadian government and their partners to help to design appropriate policies to foster youth entrepreneurship in Chad.

Suggested Citation

  • Douzounet Mallaye & Koulké Blandine Nan-Guer & Urbain Thierry Yogo & Eurydice Tormal Gosngar, 2015. "Education Language Choice and Youth Entrepreneurship in Chad," Working Papers PMMA 2015-02, PEP-PMMA.
  • Handle: RePEc:lvl:pmmacr:2015-02
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    File URL: https://portal.pep-net.org/documents/download/id/24429
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Isabel Grilo & Roy Thurik, 2008. "Determinants of entrepreneurial engagement levels in Europe and the US," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(6), pages 1113-1145, December.
    2. Angrist, Joshua D & Lavy, Victor, 1997. "The Effect of a Change in Language of Instruction on the Returns to Schooling in Morocco," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 48-76, January.
    3. Chiswick, Barry R & Miller, Paul W, 1995. "The Endogeneity between Language and Earnings: International Analyses," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(2), pages 246-288, April.
    4. Parker, Simon C. & van Praag, C. Mirjam, 2006. "Schooling, Capital Constraints, and Entrepreneurial Performance: The Endogenous Triangle," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 24, pages 416-431, October.
    5. C. Praag & Peter Versloot, 2007. "What is the value of entrepreneurship? A review of recent research," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 351-382, December.
    6. John Hayfron, 2001. "Language training, language proficiency and earnings of immigrants in Norway," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(15), pages 1971-1979.
    7. Guillermo A. Calvo & Stanislaw Wellisz, 1980. "Technology, Entrepreneurs, and Firm Size," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 95(4), pages 663-677.
    8. Casale, Daniela & Posel, Dorrit, 2011. "English language proficiency and earnings in a developing country: The case of South Africa," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 385-393, August.
    9. Martin, Bruce C. & McNally, Jeffrey J. & Kay, Michael J., 2013. "Examining the formation of human capital in entrepreneurship: A meta-analysis of entrepreneurship education outcomes," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 211-224.
    10. Allen, W. David, 2000. "Social networks and self-employment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 487-501.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Entrepreneurship; Language; Education; Youth; Chad;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups

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