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Migration and unemployment duration in OECD countries: A dynamic panel analysis

  • Vincent Fromentin

    ()

    (CERFIGE, Université de Lorraine and CREA, University of Luxembourg)

This paper examines whether or not immigration has a positive influence on the duration of unemployment, in a macroeconomic perspective. The integration of immigrants into the labor market is a recurrent topic in literature on the economic consequences of immigration, and it is a central concern to policy makers aiming to design policies. However, to our knowledge, few researchers have studied the impact of immigration on the duration of unemployment. By using panel estimations (OLS and GMM), we show that migration seems to influence short– term unemployment positively and long-term unemployment negatively, for 14 OECD destination countries between 1975 and 2008.

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File URL: http://wwwfr.uni.lu/content/download/51759/621315/file/2012-02%20-%20Migration%20and%20Unemployment%20duration%20in%20OECD%20countries%20-%20A%20dynamic%20panel%20analysis.pdf
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Paper provided by Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg in its series CREA Discussion Paper Series with number 12-02.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:luc:wpaper:12-02
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