IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/applec/45y2013i16p2295-2304.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Migration and labour markets in OECD countries: a panel cointegration approach

Author

Listed:
  • O. Damette
  • V. Fromentin

Abstract

This article examines the interaction between immigration and the host labour market of 14 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries using nonstationary panel data methodology. We estimate a trivariate Vector Error Correction Model (VECM) and derive causality tests to simultaneously assess the long- and short-term macroeconomic impact of newcomers on wages and unemployment levels in the host country. The results suggest that an increase of migrants is likely to increase wages in the destination countries in the short run but to increase them in the long run. There is no evidence of adverse effects on unemployment due to immigration in short and long-term except for Anglo-Saxon countries in the short term. Our findings also show that immigration is conditioned by levels of unemployment and wages especially in Anglo-Saxon countries.

Suggested Citation

  • O. Damette & V. Fromentin, 2013. "Migration and labour markets in OECD countries: a panel cointegration approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(16), pages 2295-2304, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:45:y:2013:i:16:p:2295-2304
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2012.661400
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00036846.2012.661400
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cohen-Goldner, Sarit & Paserman, M. Daniele, 2011. "The dynamic impact of immigration on natives' labor market outcomes: Evidence from Israel," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(8), pages 1027-1045.
    2. Francesc Ortega & Giovanni Peri, 2009. "The Causes and Effects of International Migrations: Evidence from OECD Countries 1980-2005," Working Papers 96, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
    3. Pesaran, M.H., 2004. "‘General Diagnostic Tests for Cross Section Dependence in Panels’," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0435, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    4. George J. Borjas, 2009. "The Analytics of the Wage Effect of Immigration," NBER Working Papers 14796, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Martin Wagner & Jaroslava Hlouskova, 2010. "The Performance of Panel Cointegration Methods: Results from a Large Scale Simulation Study," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(2), pages 182-223, April.
    6. Ghatak, Subrata & Moore, Tomoe, 2007. "Migration and the EU Labour Market: Granger Causality Tests on a Panel VAR," Economics Discussion Papers 2007-6, School of Economics, Kingston University London.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Hippolyte d'Albis & Ekrame Boubtane & Dramane Coulibaly, 2016. "Immigration Policy and Macroeconomic Performance in France," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 121-122, pages 279-308.
    2. Ekrame Boubtane & Dramane Coulibaly & Christophe Rault, 2013. "Immigration, Growth, and Unemployment: Panel VAR Evidence from OECD Countries," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 27(4), pages 399-420, December.
    3. repec:kap:compec:v:51:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10614-016-9610-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Cebula, Richard & Clark, Jeff, 2014. "Impact of Economic Freedom, Regulatory Quality, and Taxation on the Per Capita Real Income: An Analysis for OECD Nations and Non-G8 OECD Nations," MPRA Paper 56605, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Ali Fakih & May Ibrahim, 2016. "The impact of Syrian refugees on the labor market in neighboring countries: empirical evidence from Jordan," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 64-86, February.
    6. Enzo Weber & Roland Weigand, 2018. "Identifying macroeconomic effects of refugee migration to Germany," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 38(2), pages 852-862.
    7. Latif, Ehsan, 2015. "The relationship between immigration and unemployment: Panel data evidence from Canada," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 162-167.
    8. repec:bla:worlde:v:40:y:2017:i:6:p:1068-1088 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Vincent Fromentin, 2012. "Migration and unemployment duration in OECD countries: A dynamic panel analysis," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(2), pages 1113-1124.
    10. Marianna Oliskevych, 2015. "Dynamic Analysis and Modeling of the Labor Market Development in Ukraine," International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, vol. 5(2), pages 127-135, April.
    11. repec:hal:journl:halshs-01162441 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Vincent Fromentin & Olivier Damette & Benteng Zou, 2017. "The Global Economic Crisis and The Effect of Immigrant Workers on Native-born Employment in Europe," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(6), pages 1068-1088, June.
    13. Ekrame Boubtane & Dramane Coulibaly & Hippolyte D'Albis, 2015. "Immigration Policy and Macroeconomic Performance in France," Working Papers halshs-01135389, HAL.
    14. Aurore Gary & Audrey-Rose Menard, 2015. "Aid, Trade and Migration : How are OECD countries policies connected in times of crisis?," Working Papers of BETA 2015-11, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    15. Komivi Afawubo & Vincent Fromentin, 2013. "Financial development and economic growth: the case of ECOWAS and WAEMU," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 1715-1722.
    16. repec:eee:quaeco:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:192-201 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Vincent Fromentin & Olivier Damette & Benteng Zou, 2014. "The global economic crisis and the effect of immigration on the employment of native-born workers in Europe," CREA Discussion Paper Series 14-22, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C1 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:45:y:2013:i:16:p:2295-2304. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.