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A New Test for Rational Speculative Bubbles using Forward Exchange Rates: The Case of the Interwar German Hyperinflation


  • Efthymios Pavlidis
  • Ivan Paya
  • David Peel


The probabilistic structure of periodically collapsing bubbles implies different values for the slope coefficient of alternative efficient market hypothesis tests depending on whether the bubble is in an explosive regime or not. We exploit this fact and propose a new method for bubble detection. The method does not require the specification of the process followed by fundamentals, it is not affected by a possible explosive root of the determinants of the asset price, and provides a date-stamping strategy. We analyze the Reichsmark/Dollar exchange rate for the interwar German hyperinflation period and identify periods of rational exuberance.

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  • Efthymios Pavlidis & Ivan Paya & David Peel, 2012. "A New Test for Rational Speculative Bubbles using Forward Exchange Rates: The Case of the Interwar German Hyperinflation," Working Papers 18599597, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:lan:wpaper:18599597

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Refet S. Gürkaynak, 2008. "Econometric Tests Of Asset Price Bubbles: Taking Stock ," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 166-186, February.
    2. Funke, Michael & Hall, Stephen & Sola, Martin, 1994. "Rational bubbles during Poland's hyperinflation: Implications and empirical evidence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1257-1276, June.
    3. Peter C. B. Phillips & Yangru Wu & Jun Yu, 2011. "EXPLOSIVE BEHAVIOR IN THE 1990s NASDAQ: WHEN DID EXUBERANCE ESCALATE ASSET VALUES?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 52(1), pages 201-226, February.
    4. Walter Torous & Rossen Valkanov & Shu Yan, 2004. "On Predicting Stock Returns with Nearly Integrated Explanatory Variables," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(4), pages 937-966, October.
    5. Blanchard, Olivier Jean, 1979. "Speculative bubbles, crashes and rational expectations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 387-389.
    6. Michael Jansson & Marcelo J. Moreira, 2006. "Optimal Inference in Regression Models with Nearly Integrated Regressors," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(3), pages 681-714, May.
    7. Flood, Robert P & Garber, Peter M, 1980. "An Economic Theory of Monetary Reform," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(1), pages 24-58, February.
    8. Fama, Eugene F., 1984. "Forward and spot exchange rates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 319-338, November.
    9. Evans, George W, 1986. "A Test for Speculative Bubbles in the Sterling-Dollar Exchange Rate: 1981-84," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(4), pages 621-636, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:jrpoli:v:53:y:2017:i:c:p:340-346 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Peter C.B. Phillips & Shu-Ping Shi, 2014. "Financial Bubble Implosion," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1967, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    3. Bettendorf, Timo & Chen, Wenjuan, 2013. "Are there bubbles in the Sterling-dollar exchange rate? New evidence from sequential ADF tests," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(2), pages 350-353.
    4. Kruse, Yves Robinson & Kaufmann, Hendrik, 2015. "Bias-corrected estimation in mildly explosive autoregressions," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112897, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Daan Steenkamp, 2017. "Explosiveness in G11 currencies," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2017/02, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    6. Su, Chi-Wei & Li, Zheng-Zheng & Chang, Hsu-Ling & Lobonţ, Oana-Ramona, 2017. "When Will Occur the Crude Oil Bubbles?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 1-6.
    7. Hendrik Kaufmannz & Robinson Kruse, 2013. "Bias-corrected estimation in potentially mildly explosive autoregressive models," CREATES Research Papers 2013-10, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    8. Zhao, Yanping & Chang, Hsu-Ling & Su, Chi-Wei & Nian, Rui, 2015. "Gold bubbles: When are they most likely to occur?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 34, pages 17-23.


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