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The Impact of HIV/AIDS on Foreign Direct Investment: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Elizabeth Asiedu

    (Department of Economics, The University of Kansas)

  • Yi Jin

    (Department of Economics, Monash University)

  • Isaac Kalonda-Kanyama

    (Department of Economics, The University of Kansas)

Abstract

We employ panel data from 40 countries in sub-Saharan Africa over the period 1990-2008 to examine whether HIV/AIDS has a causal effect on FDI. We find that HIV/AIDS has a negative but diminishing effect on FDI, and this adverse effect occurs even when the HIV prevalent rate is as low as 0.1 percent. The empirical result is then rationalized by a simple theoretical model.

Suggested Citation

  • Elizabeth Asiedu & Yi Jin & Isaac Kalonda-Kanyama, 2012. "The Impact of HIV/AIDS on Foreign Direct Investment: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," WORKING PAPERS SERIES IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS 201207, University of Kansas, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kan:wpaper:201207
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    File URL: http://www2.ku.edu/~kuwpaper/2010Papers/201207.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Asiedu, Elizabeth & Jin, Yi & Nandwa, Boaz, 2009. "Does foreign aid mitigate the adverse effect of expropriation risk on foreign direct investment?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(2), pages 268-275, July.
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    3. Emily Oster, 2012. "Routes Of Infection: Exports And Hiv Incidence In Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(5), pages 1025-1058, October.
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    5. Harsha Thirumurthy & Joshua Graff Zivin & Markus Goldstein, 2008. "The Economic Impact of AIDS Treatment: Labor Supply in Western Kenya," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(3), pages 511-552.
    6. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    7. Chinhui Juhn & Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & Belgi Turan, 2013. "HIV and fertility in Africa: first evidence from population-based surveys," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(3), pages 835-853, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Asongu, Simplice & Efobi, Uchenna & Tanankem, Belmondo, 2017. "On the Relationship between Globalisation and the Economic Participation of Women in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 78860, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign Direct Investment; HIV/AIDS.;

    JEL classification:

    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems
    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations

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